Letters

A real killer
Thanks to Laura Miller for her splendid though distressing "Arena Wars," parts one and two [October 13 and October 20]. Her concluding paragraphs regarding old-style standards vs. new-style private profit explain a lot.

Some of us moved here from the East, 30 to 35 years ago, with hope and enthusiasm. The Jim Crow laws were finally legally dead, and although we lamented the hold that WASP big business had on city government, we thought that time and education would melt the hearts of hatred. (We remember standing in the post office line for several extra minutes while the woman ahead of us refused to accept the only stamps the postmaster had to offer--ones with a picture of Lincoln.) Back then, in 1957, we thought racial prejudice was the killer.

Now we see that Ray Hunt, et al., bankrupt the city and steal dependable job markets from citizens of all colors, and that Dallas leaders provide minimal care for all of us still in the 28 percent bracket or below. The result is alienation, vicious racial hatred, and surely the death of democracy, to say nothing of the crippling of Dallas.

If Laura's piece doesn't rouse the people, we wonder what will.
Joan and Pascal Covici, Jr.
Dallas

Best job in Texas
I just saw the Observer's September 22 editorial ["Best of Dallas"] naming me the "Best Gubernatorial Candidate," and although I appreciate your kind words, I want you to know I am happy with the job I have. And I want to assure you that it is the one I want to keep.

Governors get to live in a big house, grocery shop with security officers, and cut fancy ribbons. Turning the nuts and bolts of state government--and getting a real chance to make a difference--suits me much better.

Bob Bullock, Lieutenant Governor
Austin

Big and devoted
So Wilonsky is pissed at the way KERA decided to respond to its supporting listeners ["Middle of the road," October 6]. What else is new?

It is surprising, though, that the Observer would waste a couple of pages on this sniveling non-news. When a listener-supported station decides to alter its format to satisfy more of its listeners, maybe they're just doing the job they ought to do.

KERA has been announcing for years that our contributions help keep our favorite programs on the air: it's possible they were telling the truth. Maybe the "small but devoted" following of Craig Shropshire forgot to write that little check.

Sam Shimek
Dallas

Clinton a truant
I really enjoy reading Molly Ivins' columns. Her recent request for "every commentator in the country" to "give President Clinton a break" about his Haiti policy ["Give the man a break," October 6] was a most amusing example. But Molly is missing the point.

President Clinton is not being faulted because he came to his policy decisions slowly, or because he re-evaluated his views. Rather, the criticism is that he approaches every issue that lands on the presidential plate this way. Clinton has unbridled commitment to slovenly work habits and endless hand-wringing. Ivins may take great pride in that kind of presidential leadership, but most Americans are coming to the view that Clinton missed school the day they covered self-discipline.

Mark C. Clements
Dallas

Accomplished self-abusers
In response to Robert Wilonsky's article "Danger, danger" [Street Beat, October 13], I have to agree that Andy Timmons is a very sincere and complete guitar player. But I felt it was completely unnecessary to bring up names when making reference to "emotionally barren" guitar heroes. Both Steve Vai and Joe Satriani are very accomplished at the masturbatory, self-indulgent style they've chosen, and it's safe to say they feel strongly about it.

Wes Lorber
Richardson

 
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