Dead man rapping

"The D.O.C." returns with a new record and a score to settle

Before the Dre-produced No One Can Do It Better hit, released on Eazy-E's Ruthless label, the D.O.C. made his name in his new home of Compton as a writer, with early credits including tracks on N.W.A.'s instant blacktop classic, Straight Outta Compton ('88), and Eazy-E's Eazy-Duz-It ('88).

"I was Eazy's pen, because he couldn't write lyrics," Curry says. "The nigga couldn't rap, either. Man, he had the worst rhythm."

Better with numbers than words, Eazy-E turned Ruthless Records--a company he claims to have started with profits from drug dealing--into the hottest label in rap. The strain of violent, sexist "gangsta rap" established the previously ignored South Central scene as the vortex of new harder-edged hip-hop and infiltrated suburbia with tales of drive-by shootings and hooker mutilations.

At the same time, Curry insists, Eazy conducted business as if he were still on the street corner, with a focus on incoming funds and a disregard for paying out what was owed.

"In the hip-hop world, Eazy-E was the personification of evil," Curry says. "He paid my hospital bill, about $60,000, but he made me pay him back, which is cool, except that I later found out that he paid the bill out of my share of a publishing deal he made for me. The muthafucka used my money and then made me pay him back."

Curry also tells about the time he traded his publishing rights to Straight Outta Compton, which has sold more than five million copies and counting, for a gold necklace. "I was 19 years old," Curry says. "I didn't know about publishing back then, and I didn't care. I was part of the hottest team in the rap game, and I just wanted to keep makin' dope records."

It was Suge Knight--whose Knightlife publishing company hit it big by owning seven tracks on Vanilla Ice's To the Extreme blockbuster--who convinced the D.O.C. and Dr. Dre they were being ripped off by Ruthless. When Knight exacted their release from the label--allegedly giving Eazy-E a choice between a pen in hand or a lead pipe upside the head, according to Eazy-E in Jory Farr's music-biz insider book Moguls and Madmen--Eazy-E and Ruthless filed a $250 million federal racketeering and extortion lawsuit against Dr. Dre, Curry, Knight, and Griffey. The suit was eventually dismissed, but Knight's reputation as "the wrong nigga to fuck with" was solidified.

"The four of us had a plan and we set it into motion," Curry says about the seeds of the partnership. "We used the money from Sony to build that company, and we did everything the right way, only I didn't get no money, but now I goin' get it." He says the last part with a singsong swagger that sounds like one of his old raps.

"I've known Suge Knight a long time. Hell, I was even tighter with him than Dre was for a while," Curry insists, "and to be totally honest with you, the dude ain't all he's cracked up to be."

Now, if Curry can only convince his mother of that.

Dr. Dre met Curry in Dallas in 1987, when the Curry was a member of the Fila Fresh Crew and Dre was in town as guest DJ on a weekly rap show hosted by Dr. Rock on KKDA-FM (K104). "Rap was just being born in Dallas, but I'd been rappin' since I was 13, and I was already real good at the shit," Curry says. "Dre heard me rap and, he says, 'If you come to California, nigga, we can make some money.' Me and Dre just clicked."

Curry had no qualms whatsoever about leaving a Dallas rap scene that was full of copycats. "When they first came out, Nemesis [Fila Fresh Crew's crosstown rivals] sounded like they were from Brooklyn or Queens, but then I came back two years later and they sounded like they were from Compton," Curry says. "I'm a leader, not a follower, so I moved from the projects of West Dallas to the projects of Compton."

Once in L.A., where he slept on Dre's couch for the first year, Curry says he was reborn. "In Dallas, I was pretty good, but when I hit Cali I was suddenly the best. I don't know what happened, but I was un-fucking-touchable." Indeed, with No One Can Do It Better, the D.O.C. established himself as a raging new talent on the West Coast rap scene. Dr. Dre, who cooked up an awesome stew of live instrumentation and silky soul samples, left no question about who was rap's best producer.

"Dre is the Quincy Jones of my generation, the complete master of the studio," Curry says. "Every little sound you hear on his records, the nigga done complexed on for hours. He runs shit through his head a million times before he puts it down."

Asked if he's sad that his association with his mentor has apparently ended, Curry says, "It ain't ever over. You just go through phases of your life when you do fucked-up shit, but the real problem ain't Dre. In fact, Dre's the one who's been telling me that I needed to get a lawyer and go after my money."

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