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Horace Caraker got what he wanted: jail time

Caraker knew what he was doing when he left the note: On August 25, Mexican president-elect Vicente Fox and Gov. George W. Bush were in town for a well-publicized meeting at the University of Texas at Dallas. Because of this, and given his history of making threats against elected officials, the Observer turned over the note to Dallas police, which then informed the Secret Service of Caraker's missive. A copy of the note was also faxed to Laughlin. The letters are not mentioned in the supervised release violation report.

If Buchmeyer determines that Caraker has violated terms of his release, he will likely receive between four and 10 months in federal prison. Then, he will be released--and the whole process will begin again. Caraker will get out, only to beg to be let back in. Mickelsen would like to see Caraker committed to a long-term mental-health facility; better that than spend $50,000 of the taxpayers' money annually incarcerating a man who's done nothing.

"Unless he convinces doctors he's a true and serious danger, he will get released," Mickelsen says. "There is some craziness going on here."

Horace Caraker, pictured here in federal prison in 1999, will likely return to his home sweet home after Friday.
Martin Menocal
Horace Caraker, pictured here in federal prison in 1999, will likely return to his home sweet home after Friday.

Only Horace Caraker isn't crazy at all. He knows just what he's doing.

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