Letters

Pave the Damn Street; Lipscomb's Last Hope; Oak Cliff's Secret

Pave the Damn Street

Forget those Calatrava bridges: What an interesting article about Dallas City Council members Elba Garcia, Laura Miller and Mitch Rasansky and the changing political landscape in Dallas ("Brave New City," May 31). My analysis of Dallas politics is quite similar.

I think most middle-class taxpayers are sick of our lobbyist/Mayor Ron Kirk and the council trying to figure out how they can spend more and more of our tax dollars to make some fabulously wealthy guy or successful corporation just a little bit richer at our expense. They've always got their hands out. It's unseemly.

They can't keep the streets paved or inspect water mains, or handle managing the basic infrastructure of the city, which is crumbling around us. But damned if we don't have money and lots of time and energy for the big projects like Olympics 2012.

I've just got one thing to say about 2012. Screw 2012, pave the damn street and then ask me whether I want the Olympics or a Calatrava bridge. By the way, the answer isn't just no, it's hell no.

Bill Newbill
Via e-mail

Gracious writer: Jim Schutze can really write a story. I enjoy all his columns, and they are usually the first ones I read every week. A very gracious writer and person, or so he seems.

Stan Hernandez
Via e-mail

Lipscomb's Last Hope

Federal, no; justice, no: All those of us who support Mr. Lipscomb ever wanted was a level playing field, and he did not get that from the federal justice system ("Al Strikes Back," June 7). The same questions the appeals judges asked are the same ones I ask. I wonder who really wanted Al out of the way and why? Black people in Dallas want the guilty punished also.

Betty Culbreath Lister
Dallas

Oak Cliff's Secret

A cool breeze from the south: I had read your May 17 article by Rose Farley ("Bean Waiting") with some amusement. It was filled with common myths that I had presumed were presented as sarcasm. However, too many in this city think these myths are true about Oak Cliff. Consequently, any attempted sarcasm failed, as was evident by some of the letters I read in the most recent Dallas Observer (May 31).

I often selfishly think it is to the benefit of us living in Oak Cliff that this ignorance about our area of Dallas continues. I do not want Oak Cliff to become another concrete jungle like the places in our city north of here. The truth is that the most attractive parts of Dallas are in Oak Cliff. We also have cleaner air and lower ozone levels. We are almost always one or two degrees cooler than the northern parts of Dallas. (This is all thanks to the prevailing wind from the south that blows the rest of Dallas' air to the north.)

To preserve Oak Cliff and control development, those of us who live here must get together. I am fearful that the secret that was Oak Cliff will not last much longer. We will be targeted by developers like the cotton fields in North Dallas were. We certainly need a more family-friendly development than other areas of Dallas have been subjected to.

And Rose Farley, if you have not yet seen the nice homes here in Oak Cliff, give me a call.

Bill Betzen
Dallas

Editor's note: Dallas Observer staff writer Rose Farley is a former Oak Cliff resident.

Ghostbusters III

Overwhelming response: I just got through reading your overly harsh review of Evolution ("Old Ghosts," June 7) and just had to respond to it. I live in Alb, New Mexico, and had the opportunity to view both the unfinished version of this movie as well as the finished product. I also have been following Internet reviews of the same. From what I have seen and read, this movie received overwhelming audience response. So I just wanted to ask you, Did you view the same movie as the rest of us or are you on some mind-altering medication?

Susan Levine
Via e-mail

You Are Getting Sleepy

Don't forget certified hypnotherapists: I read the article by Mark Donald ("Fat Like Me," May 31) with great interest. However, I am concerned that it was written with only two groups in the hypnosis community represented--the "professionals" and the "lay hypnotists."

In fact, there is another, unmentioned group: the highly trained "unlicensed professionals." It should be noted that many of these people have significantly more training in hypnosis than many health-care and mental health professionals who use hypnosis simply as an adjunct to their existing practice.

For more information and comparison, I refer you to the Web sites of two certifying organizations: the American Society of Clinical Hypnosis, at www.asch.net/certify.htm, and the American Council of Hypnotist Examiners, at www.hypnoschool.com/ache.html. Each Web site has specific details on the requirements for membership in and certification by that organization.

A word of advice for anyone considering hypnosis: Always check the credentials and certifying organization of any hypnotist or hypnotherapist that you are considering. Ask for a consultation with the same person you will be working with. Rapport and trust are essential if you want good results, and these things should be established early. Ask about their training and be wary of vague answers. Anyone who has invested the time and effort it takes to be thoroughly trained in this field is proud of that fact and will be happy to discuss it in depth with you. You should get specific answers to any questions you have and, most important, you should understand and be comfortable with those answers.

MaryAnne Campbell
Mark A. Parenti
Certified Clinical Hypnotherapists
Via e-mail

 
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