Blonde Ambition

Princess Superstar could be the first white-girl rapper to break through to the mainstream

While it's tough to listen to someone so culturally keen speak in clichés, Princess Superstar's unwavering social scrutiny is what really makes her compelling. "I don't feel above celebrity worship," Kirschner admits. "I have to laugh at myself and see things honestly. I am, like, observant about that." While her previous records were primarily smutty, Princess Superstar Is tones it down somewhat to show off her greatest strength, which is being "like, observant."

A devoted pop-culture reveler, Kirschner has a particular soft spot for the silliest aspects of celebrity. "I am obsessed with, you might not know about them, but they're huge in New York, the Hiltons," she says, referring to Paris and Nicky, the teen-age hotel heiresses, quasi-models and social scene fixtures with notoriously bad taste. She recounts a particular Paris Hilton episode, the Jane magazine make-under. "Oh, my God, yeah, she was in that magazine, and she was, like, pissed that they wouldn't let her wear lipstick." With great enthusiasm, she rattles off more. "Jocelyne Wildstein, that lady who got all that plastic surgery to look like a cat. I can't get over these gross social celebrities that are famous for no reason at all."

In the modern social era, other female rappers have turned the socialite persona on its ear. Although Princess Superstar wears Versace like the rest of them, she's not about to sell her soul--literally or in a moral sense. She says repeatedly, "Nah, man, I'm just a musician," which doesn't seem quite complete. The fact is that no white female rapper has ever been really respected or revered, and even now, Princess Superstar verges on novelty. The reality is harsh: "The public perception, and the corporate perception of a white girl rapper, doesn't exist," she says. "There's a lot of sexism on top of it." Being earnest and gung-ho about musicianship is necessary then, because "major labels have been afraid of marketing someone like me...Being a white girl in hip-hop is inherently cheesy and has to be handled delicately."

"Major labels have been afraid of marketing someone like me," Concetta Kirschner, a.k.a Princess Superstar, says. "Being a white girl in hip-hop is inherently cheesy and has to be handled delicately."
Frank Khalfun
"Major labels have been afraid of marketing someone like me," Concetta Kirschner, a.k.a Princess Superstar, says. "Being a white girl in hip-hop is inherently cheesy and has to be handled delicately."

That said, Kirschner claims she doesn't approach it from that end of the deal. "I never considered myself a white girl in hip-hop," she says, and, again, "I'm just a musician, and that's all that I care about." Maybe that's why Kirschner is levelheaded about the attention she's received thus far. "People focus on my Jewishness, and I'm proud to be a part of the tradition of Jews in hip-hop," she says. "But people focus on what they wanna focus on, whether it's my Jewishness or my tits. I'm over it."

Whether or not Kirschner is as earnest as she acts doesn't really matter. As a personality, Princess Superstar is amusing, but as a rapper, she might really shake things up. Hopefully.

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