High-Calorie Splendor

Just what Dallas needs, more food and drink

4/22
Though the long-running event was recently severed from The Dallas Morning NewsWine Competition held earlier this year and the newspaper is no longer a sponsor, the Dallas Wine & Food Festival will still bring a throng of vintners, chefs, authors and culinary experts and those who hunger after them. It will also feature some of the Wine Competition winners. Join this Big D convergence as it flits and whisks through the world of wine, high culinary craft, dining out and doing it in. The festival kicks off Wednesday with a celebration of the film Big Night in the West Village. Then on Friday, April 25, join Mansion on Turtle Creek chef Dean Fearing and Domaine Chandon winemaker Wayne Donaldson at 7 p.m. at the Mansion for a spread featuring the tongue-titillating artistry of the top winners from the sixth annual Rising Stars Contest ($125 per person). Saturday and Sunday, April 26 and April 27, will be packed with more wine and food seminars than you can stand without frequent bathroom breaks and a designated driver. On Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (general admission is $25) experience "Entertaining With Style" at Decorative Center Dallas, a series of demonstrations including chef forays (Grady Spears, Chisholm Club; Kent Rathbun, Abacus; Doug Brown and Joel Harloff from Landmark, among others), floral design (Dr. Delphinium Designs' director Tom Kelley), book signings (Dotty Griffith, Celebrating Barbecue, and Gwen Ashley Walters, The Great Ranch Cookbook & The Cool Mountain Cookbook, among others) and more (seminars are held from 9 a.m. to 2:45 p.m. and prices vary). Not containable in one building, Wine & Food Festival events spill into the Adolphus Hotel on Sunday from 2 p.m. to 4:45 p.m. and include "Everyday Wines for Everyday People," featuring a panel of experts who will discuss medal-winning chucks for less than 15 bucks, and a silent auction to benefit Farmers Market Friends from 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. disposing of everything from jeroboams of fine champagne to dinners at Dallas' finest restaurants by bid. The event is capped off Sunday at the Adolphus with a Taste of the World from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. ($65 per person) featuring an elegant stumble through near-endless sips of award-winning wines plus nibble samples from more than 30 Dallas-area restaurants and food purveyors. For a complete listing of events and prices plus Internet discounts, visit www.dallasfoodandwinefestival.com or call 214-741-6888. --Mark Stuertz

4/20
Dogs and DSO Invade

For some it's a chance to show off their lovable dogs that have been cooped up all winter. For others it's an opportunity to hear free classical music and get that first sunburn of the season. And for a few others it's all about silly Easter bonnets and getting drunk in the park. But for whatever reason they choose to attend, the Turtle Creek Association's 16th annual Easter in the Park is a rite of spring that attracts 10,000 people. Arrive early to stake out a prime piece of real estate with a picnic blanket. Organized festivities start at 12:45 p.m. when the SPCA of Dallas showcases more than 20 dogs available for adoption. At 1 p.m. the Pooch Parade features creatively garbed pets and owners strutting down the street and competing for prizes and applause. The Dallas Symphony Orchestra, under the direction of conductor Lawrence Loh, performs a springtime-themed concert including Vivaldi's "Four Seasons" and Rimsky-Korsakov's "Flight of the Bumblebee" and "Russian Easter Overture" at 3 p.m. Sunday at Lee Park, Turtle Creek Boulevard and Lemmon Avenue. For more information on entering the Pooch Parade, call Turtle Creek Association at 214-979-3275. --Jay Webb

4/19
Head Games

Finally. Someone's resurrected the true meaning of Easter. Forget about that weird bunny with the eggs. Forget about Christ coming back from the dead. And definitely forget about marshmallow Peeps. Easter bonnets are back, and the British Emporium is looking for the best of the best. On Saturday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., the store is holding its first Easter bonnet competition. Categories include Prettiest Bonnet, Most Elegant Bonnet, Funniest Bonnet, Most British Bonnet and Most Texan Bonnet. There's also a category for car bonnets (that's a hood in Brit speak). Prizes are at stake, so get creative. 140 N. Main St., Grapevine. Call 817-421-2311 or go to www.british-emporium.com for more information. In other bonnet news, eatZi's is also hosting an EaZter bonnet contest. Entries will be judged Sunday at 2:30 p.m. at Lee Park, and the one with the most stylish hat will win a catered dinner for eight compliments of the restaurant. Contestants can pick up an entry form and rules for the contest at eatZi's, 3403 Oak Lawn Ave. Call 214-526-1515. --Rhonda Reinhart

4/19
Barely Legal
The Omni does the time warp

Twenty years ago, the Cold War and The Big Chill were in the hot zone. Mötley Crüe was sending shout-outs to the devil while Michael Jackson composed pop horror. So, some things don't change. Texas hair was big then; many would argue it's big now. One thing we can't argue is the screen size at Fort Worth's Omni Theater. It's 10 times longer to gawk at. Plus, there are 72 speakers. That's, like, audio-visual Nirvana. Not bad, Fort Worth. This Saturday, when the seats tilt back and the lights go out, Omni will take a blast to the past by going retro on prices in honor of its 20-year anniversary. All weekend, tickets are $4 for adults and $2.50 for children and seniors. Perhaps you're parked uptown and don't know what to expect in a giant-screen adventure. We'll guide you through. Close one eye. Imagine soaring over the volcanoes of Tahiti. Open it, then close the other eye and dive 350 feet into shark-ridden waters. Now hop the rail to check it out for real. The Omni Theater is located at the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History at 1501 Montgomery St. in Fort Worth's Cultural District. For show times and information, call 817-255-9300 or go to www.fortworthmuseum.org. --Desirée Henry

 
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