Holy Land Family Fights Terrorist Label

Despite a hung jury, the trials are far from over

"These groups do not care about our country. They do not care about diversity. Stand up for what's right and help protect America from her enemies that are within," Kaufman proclaimed.

Dorrie O'Brien, a mother whose son has served as an engineer in Kuwait with the military during the Iraq War, told the small group of protesters, "The ICNA is putting on the event to show Muslims are just like us. But they aren't. They don't think like us." 

Later the next day, Noor read an article about the protest to her mother. 

Sisters Huda (second from left, in scarf) and Asma Elashi, along with their cousin Rawan, enjoy a ride at Six Flags Over Texas during an outing with Muslim families, sponsored by the Islamic Circle of North America.
Mike Mazulo
Sisters Huda (second from left, in scarf) and Asma Elashi, along with their cousin Rawan, enjoy a ride at Six Flags Over Texas during an outing with Muslim families, sponsored by the Islamic Circle of North America.
A woman at Six Flags wears a shirt advertising Noor Elashi's Web site, set up in defense of those accused of aiding terrorism through the Holy Land Foundation.
Mike Mazulo
A woman at Six Flags wears a shirt advertising Noor Elashi's Web site, set up in defense of those accused of aiding terrorism through the Holy Land Foundation.

"He should have called it Americans for hate," Majida said.  

Majida arrived in the United States some 20 years ago fleeing Palestine. One day soon after arriving, she was checking out at a Sam's Club when the checker told her she shouldn't be wearing her headscarf anymore.  He laughed at her lack of conformity and assured her it wouldn't be long before she got rid of it.

And just last week riding the DART rail from Richardson to Union Station, she was mistaken for a nun by a fellow rider. He had alcohol on his breath, and he asked her for some money. "I'm in worse shape than you," she said. 

Minutes later a woman sat next to her. "Aren't you hot in that thing?" the woman asked, referring to her Muslim head covering. You decide in your mind and in your heart what you are going to be, Majida said.  

Ignorance, Majida says, is what divides us. So does enmity, a subject that occupies Noor's dreams.

A week before the jury ended its deliberations in deadlock, Noor dreamed she was in Wal-Mart and lost her temper.  The manager came up to her shouting loudly and told her to get out of the store.

"It was so out of nowhere," says Noor. "I just felt the pressure building up and I started yelling at the top of my lungs back at him, 'You don't even know me.  You have no right...'"

 In her dream she started to break down and cry and says at that point the manager threw something at her, hitting her in the chest.  She spun around and saw a crowd of media staring at her from the other side of the glass. She turned to the media and said, "Did you guys see that?  He just threw something at me." 

She woke up with tears, a sore chest and tense muscles and could not believe how real the nightmare seemed.

« Previous Page
 |
 
1
 
2
 
3
 
4
 
5
 
All
 
My Voice Nation Help
0 comments
Sort: Newest | Oldest
 
Loading...