Aging Musically

Blondie's frontwoman is still stage-worthy

It is hard to believe that Deborah Harry, new wave's original diva, turned 62 this summer. Yet her advanced years do little to diminish her charisma and onstage prowess, as Harry is nearly as feisty and fashionable as she was when she started Blondie in the mid '70s. The former waitress and Playboy Bunny has come a long way since her early days slumming around CBGB with Television and the Talking Heads. Harry actually had a credible acting stint (David Cronenberg's creepy and deficient Videodrome and John Waters' semi-lovable Hairspray) sandwiched between a so-so solo career and various attempts at resurrecting her old band. In 1999, Harry became the oldest female singer to reach No. 1 in the UK when a re-formed Blondie released the single "Maria" and the accompanying LP No Exit. The master tapes for the follow-up were lost in the 9/11 terrorist attacks, which delayed the release (until 2002) of The Curse of Blondie, a surprisingly punchy re-creation of the band's signature mix of new wave and disco. Her recent solo effort, Necessary Evil, features the credible hip-hop of "Dirty and Deep," a track that speaks out against the incarceration of Li'l Kim. Deborah Harry's hipster status continues unabated no matter how close she may be to the restful confines of the Big Apple's most chic retirement community. Deborah Harry performs with Kristoffer Ragnstam 8 p.m. Wednesday at House of Blues, 2200 N. Lamar St. Doors are at 7 p.m. Tickets are $25 to $39.50. Call 214-373-8000 or visit ticketmaster.com.
Wed., Nov. 28, 8 p.m., 2007

 
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