The Right Stuff|The Other Evolution

"Battle Against Teaching Evolution in Texas Begins," by Jesse Hyde, March 20

The Right stuff

May I please begin by saying "Bravo!"

This is one of the best articles I have ever read on the religious-right movement in Texas education. I am forwarding this article to everyone I know. You are a champion in my eyes.

Thank you so much. I hope this will help bring awareness to the politicization of education. Most of the politicians backing this movement know it is not best for children and yet they persist just to get the votes of uninformed citizens. You have done an exquisite job of portraying the people, showing the facts and painting a chilling picture of the war on science.

I recently spoke to Senator [Eliot] Shapleigh, who hopes to mount a Senate investigation on the SBOE.

Take care. I expect you will receive comments from the crazies as well.

Christina Castillo Comer, Leander

"Four Clubs Closed in Deep Ellum and Exposition Park in the Last Month," by Pete Freedman, March 27

The other evolution

One thing a neighborhood has to do to survive is evolve. I have a serious feeling [Deep Ellum] is evolving as we speak. Once the DART line goes live, things will begin to pick up again, so no need to worry.

The four places mentioned in the article all had separate reasons for going south. Club One was attracting a crowd that was causing BS in the neighborhood that made a lot of the neighbors, including myself, resentful. We were tired of the idiots coming down here and causing fights, breaking into cars and the owners barely doing anything to curb the problems. We went to the city and made our voices heard, hence them closing along with Club Uropa and Tomcats.

Elm St./Darkside was an example of not being able to afford their property. I have a feeling they'll be back, as this place is a neighborhood landmark.

Sloppyland needed to navigate the proper channels to get their place open. They didn't want to wait and got slapped for it.

Pete, you did an excellent job.

Chris Von Danger, via dallasobserver.com

While I laud the optimism of the longtime residents and enthusiastic "save Deep Ellum" members, perhaps they should take a bit more action on an individual level to restore business to themselves rather than banding together in one big, sinking ship.

When it comes to music, there's a lot going on in the metroplex that the Deep Ellum and Expo Park venues largely seem to be ignoring. Ten years ago I used to go to Deep Ellum every weekend with friends and go from club to club finding new music. The problems these clubs are running into now is that these great draws would rather play in a house in Denton (or the kick-ass one on Swiss) than deal with all of the e-mails, the nonsense of getting in and out, the paying to park, the overpriced drinks and tiny crowds that come with the territory of trying to book a gig in Deep Ellum. It's a vicious cycle that began as soon as bands realized they had options other than the hassle that Deep Ellum has become.

Now in this digital age, where it's so easy to come across new and amazing stuff in our own backyard, Club Dada (the only place in Deep Ellum left worth playing) can't even maintain a Web site to tell me what's coming up. I didn't even know that the Fallout Lounge booked bands...they don't have a Web site. New Amsterdam is great, but again, no clue as to what is happening there besides jazz on Mondays. Sloppyworld looked promising but got slapped down before it could even take off. The other places left either simply aren't interested in booking locally or are so partitioned in their own little genres that their slices of the...pie are completely insignificant.

It wouldn't take much for Deep Ellum to get with it. Sitting around in a group whining (or partying) isn't going to do it. Much like this paper, they need to take a look at what's going on around them.

Comment by a musician, via dallasobserver.com

Corrections

In our March 27 issue, an editor's error caused the names of Johnny Oates and Eric Nadel to be misspelled in the story "Most Revered Rangers" by Richie Whitt. In the same issue, the name of Randall Dunning was misspelled in photograph caption accompanying the story "Party Pooper" by Jesse Hyde.

 
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