Dallas' Victory Park Struggles to Deliver a Win

Blame it on a bad economy, a bad idea or both. Ross Perot Jr.'s glitzy downtown district is in big trouble

In October 2007, Dallas businessman Ross Perot Jr. was featured in a USA Today story about the unlikely rise of urban living in Texas. Photographed on the balcony of the towering Ghostbar, at the apex of the posh W Hotel, Perot looked confident as he discussed why developments such as his Victory Park—a $1 billion glimmering collection of high-rises, pricey restaurants and shops jutting from the American Airlines Center—were the Next Big Thing.

"You can move into a beautiful downtown home, walk to the arts, walk to a basketball game, walk to restaurants," Perot said. "There is something unique in the downtown fabric that you couldn't get in the suburbs." 

Only these days, at his Victory Park development, that fabric isn't getting much wear.

On a Saturday in January, a little after midnight, there are only a few people milling about Perot's district. Most of them are headed to the Ghostbar, one of the few places that hasn't shut down for the night. At the AT&T Plaza, the heart of Victory Park that fronts the southern edge of AAC, two mammoth super screens blare a series of artsy images to a crowd of, well, no one.  Billed as "one of the largest outdoor digital mediums in the world," the screens were supposed to be a landmark attraction in the glamorous development. Now they just seem a once-coveted Christmas gift tossed awkwardly aside.

In startling contrast, a few miles across town, in the cozy, older North Henderson Avenue neighborhood just off North Central Expressway, there remains a veritable parade of nightlife. Many of the men are dressed in snug jeans and untucked shirts; the women are mostly clad in denim and tight-fitting blouses. All of them, as if it were a law, are fashionably thin. On both sides of Henderson, running nearly a mile toward Ross Avenue, people crowd the sidewalks and spill into the streets, enhancing the authentic neighborhood feel of the area's blend of homespun hangouts and high-priced restaurants.

While Victory Park, the well-hyped, taxpayer-funded district, can't buy a crowd, North Henderson has gained immense popularity as if by accident. The same tale of two developments can be told about Victory Park and the West Village. On a Tuesday lunch hour in January, there is barely a soul wandering through Victory Park Lane, the boulevard that runs through the heart of the district. Meanwhile, at the always-bustling West Village in Uptown, parking is hard to find—as is an empty table at Taco Diner.

More than a decade earlier, Perot named his project "Victory," which seemed a reflection of his epic ambitions, as if the gods themselves had predetermined its success. He didn't want to open another Cheesecake Factory or an Old Navy in the shadow of a new, publicly funded arena. He wanted an upscale, one-of-a-kind retail and residential district, one that would surprise and titillate. His would be a destination district that the right kind of people would seek out.

Perot didn't apologize for his pretensions. Interviewed by the Wall Street Journal Online in an October 2006 story about the kind of crowd he wanted to frequent the American Airlines Center, he said, "A U2 concert is fabulous. KISS, not so good."

But now, nearly three years after its first shops opened, Victory Park still hasn't found itself. Even before the economy went south, the district often turned into a ghost town when the arena was dark. Ritzy retailers have fled, while other businesses are struggling to hang on. Hillwood, the Perot real estate firm that runs the development, still has big ambitions for its development but recently postponed plans to build a second luxury hotel and now hopes to shed Victory's exclusive image by leasing to more affordable shops and restaurants. The KISS crowd, or any crowd, is now welcome.

"I don't think they spent this kind of money thinking it was going to be this quiet," says Mike Malin, an owner of the parent company that owns the Board Room sports bar in Victory Park. "I think Hillwood put together an impressive mix of nightlife and restaurants, and they expected the community to embrace it more."

It's an unlikely turn of events for a master-planned, 75-acre district that had everything going for it: A rich developer, a prime location, ultra-modern architecture and those towering screens reminiscent of Times Square. On top of those amenities, the AAC is home to the Dallas Mavericks, the Dallas Stars and nearly every musical act popular enough to sell out its 12,500-seat concert capacity.

But Victory Park is still trying to secure its place in the city. On special occasions, like New Year's Eve, when the plaza teems with an electric crowd, the district feels like a public square, a space for collective celebration. No other part of Dallas—not even a resurging downtown core—holds that promise. But at other times, the district seems like a flop—an ill-conceived, sterile mega-development that is as predictable as a shopping mall.

Perot's project doesn't seem like a sure thing anymore. It didn't help that Hillwood bungled the debut, opening with too few stores, and all of them pricey. Or that Victory Park is a destination location that is difficult to find and has innate design flaws that seem to steer foot traffic away from its retailers rather than toward them. And then there's the economy, which continues to sour and decimate high-end retail.

People, particularly the young and the beautiful, are as finicky as they are fickle. Maybe they just like to stumble upon their own haunts rather than fall for a district that was gift-wrapped for them.

"There's the famous line: 'Build it and they will come,'" says Patrick Colombo, the president of Restaurant Works, which operates the Victory Tavern City Grille.  "I think that's what Hillwood expected.  I think the original leasing team thought they'd set the world on fire."

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In November, Lifestyle Fashion Terminal (LFT), an über-trendy clothing store at Victory Park, closed its doors after a 20-month run. In a press release, the owner blamed the down economy and the district's "yet-to-mature trade area."

In many ways, LFT was the embodiment of Perot's original vision. At 30,000 square feet with cold, concrete floors, the place had an edgy, mechanized feel that fit right in with the district's hyper-modern look. In its annual "Best of Dallas" issue, the Dallas Observer saluted the retailer for catering to "serious fashionistas," who were advised to "rethink those plans to make a binge shopping trip to New York and drop the airfare on a spree at LFT."  

LFT's demise came just weeks after Nove Italiano, a restaurant with a prime spot in the plaza next to the AAC, announced it was leaving. Before that, Hillwood said it was halting plans to build the 43-story Mandarin Hotel, which, like the W Hotel across the street, was set to include condominiums. Meanwhile, the AFI Film Festival moved its box office to NorthPark, and Noka Chocolate, a high-end Victory Park chocolatier, moved to the upscale mall as well.

Other retailers seem to be barely hanging on. Unlike the district's restaurateurs, they don't see a bump in business on game or event nights. And during lunch hour, Victory Park's shops are often empty; at G Star Raw, a clothing store featuring $180 jeans and $125 wind breakers, a friendly clerk seems surprised when a visitor walks in.

"My personal opinion—and I don't know this for a fact—is that [many retailers] are going to go the way of LFT," Colombo says. "There are so many good shopping centers in Dallas they are competing with."

The recurring complaint you hear about Victory Park—and it comes so often it might as well be etched into center ice at a Stars game—is that the district offers very few low-priced shops and restaurants. Unlike the West Village, which blends high-end retail with affordable places like the Gap and the TomTom Asian Grill, Victory Park doesn't give you the choice of buying an $8 lunch or a $40 pair of jeans. Everything is expensive. If Victory Park did offer low-end retail, the pricier shops might benefit too.

"More and more people are doing high-low dressing where you combine something you bought at an expensive store and something at Target," says Holly Jefferson, a local fashion writer. "At NorthPark you can go to Neiman's or Nordstrom's and then Forever 21 to balance it out, but at Victory, you don't have that option."

The president of Cityplace, Neal Sleeper, who has developed property around the West Village, admits he was initially envious that Victory Park had an anchor tenant like the AAC. That's a guaranteed crowd of around 15,000 people for at least half the year, he figured. But then he realized that it would be difficult to find retailers that could complement an arena. And at Victory Park, the initial dining and shopping offerings seemed too expensive and out of context to appeal to a person who was already emptying his wallet at a basketball game.

"I'm not sure that many people say, 'I'm going to go to a Mavericks game, and say, while I'm down there, I'm going to buy a suit,'" Sleeper explains. "I think [Hillwood's] on the right track by adding some more affordable restaurant and retail options."

To any urban mixed-use district (an area that combines shopping, dining and housing), the vital element is foot traffic. Even if people don't buy a beer, they can add to the energy and bustle of an area, giving off a hospitable feel that makes people want to stay and play. Besides, impulse buys can be a significant chunk of any retailer's bottom line, but not if the area lacks the kind of density that will offer a crowd fleeing a game more reasons to remain.

The original design for the project included developing both sides of Victory Park Lane. But Hillwood put that plan on hold when it postponed construction of the Mandarin Hotel. So now, one side has all the shops and restaurants, while the other is largely reserved for parking lots. That creates a disjointed look and makes Victory Park less pedestrian-friendly.

"The plan was to have both sides of the street filled with stores," says David Levine, who has worked as a consultant on Victory Park. "You can't have a single loaded street; you don't create the synergy of people crossing the street."

It appears that Victory Park didn't follow the fundamentals of mixed-use projects by opening with so few tenants. Levine, who now is a partner in Urban Partners which owns and leases West Village, says viable urban districts need to have at least 50 shops to create a sense of place. West Village has more than 70 different shops and restaurants and has plans for around 30 more as it expands toward Central Expressway. But Victory Park, nearly three years after its launch, has fewer than 30—and opened with far fewer than that.

"You have to fix the problem of door count and store count," Levine says. "It's time to rethink the program and that doesn't mean just putting in more affordable dining."

For a mixed-use development to succeed, you have to get people walking around. But if you only have high-priced stores on one side of a closed-off street, you've failed Urban Planning 101. "You want to have a situation where people feel connected," says Bill Hudnut, a consulting fellow with the Washington, D.C.-based Urban Land Institute. "It has to be a walkable area....you need short blocks, smaller stores, and mom and pop operations."

Perot declined a request for an interview, as did Hillwood CEO Todd Platt. Instead, Platt issued a statement through the company's public relations firm:

"While our project is well ahead of its originally announced schedule, we have experienced some setbacks in terms of store and restaurant closures. As we look to the future, we are refining our strategy—placing a greater emphasis on providing more options that appeal to a broader base of consumers to ensure that Victory Park remains a vibrant part of the new downtown Dallas."

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It's easy to forget how starkly magnificent the district looks, particularly in the evening with the Dallas skyline as its powerful backdrop. It would have been less bold to assemble brick and stone buildings and remain true to the architectural context of the arena's retro-look. But Perot has spun a whole, new metallic city out of thin air.

Victory Park is a place that evokes a range of feelings. Its detractors say it's like a Park Cities trophy wife—robotic, cold and plastic.

"It just feels really, really Dallas over there," Jefferson says. "I love to shop and check out new areas, but it just seems closed off, intimidating and exclusive."

But on an aesthetic level, Victory Park is on the cutting edge of architectural design. In particular, its two prominent high-rises, the W Hotel and Cirque, a luxury apartment building, give the city its first truly modern buildings in nearly 20 years.

"We have a great contemporary skyline and the W and Cirque are consistent with that," says John Sughrue, the chief executive officer of Brooks Partners, a Dallas-based real estate and investment firm. "They are progressive, they are modern, and, in essence, they are emblematic of what's happening in the architectural arts at the moment."

But despite the district's artistic flourishes, two fundamental flaws of Victory Park may actually lie in its design. On a warm Wednesday evening in January, when the Dallas Mavericks were hosting the New Orleans Hornets, hundreds of fans were walking from downtown to the AAC. This was the crowd that Victory Park promised for its restaurants and retailers. But there was one small problem. Only a handful of people were strolling through Victory Park Lane, the district's signature street. The rest were walking down Houston, on the east side of Victory Park, where they couldn't see any of the district's shops and restaurants.

"When there's an event, the foot traffic is walking on Houston—so everyone misses all the stores," says Josh Babb, the general manager of Kenichi, an upscale sushi restaurant at Victory. "That hurts a lot of the retailers. They don't get anything on game nights, it seems."

Fans who park their cars in the massive northwest lots may never encounter the Victory's plaza at all. All those businesses who were lured to Victory Park by the promise of a built-in customer base might as well be located in North Dallas.

The second design flaw is related to the first. If you are walking out of the south gate of the AAC and into the plaza where two sleek glass buildings flank the arena, the first thing you see is the side of the W Hotel. There is no clear view of Victory Park Lane. You might not even realize it's there.  

"The plaza and Victory Park Lane...would interact better and foot traffic would flow better with a more direct linkage," says Robert Bagwell, one of the founding developers of the West Village. "Since the AAC was built first and had a different architect/planner, its placement may have been set before the rest of the site was laid out. It may have been too late."

Another misstep occurred when Hillwood allowed two of the restaurants on the plaza, N9NE Steakhouse and Nove Italiano, to cover their glass walls. Passersby, walking to a game or a concert, cannot take a quick peek inside. The whole point of the plaza is to create a vibrant public space—think Rockefeller Center—which is why the giant screens line the plaza. You can't let your two most prominent restaurants operate in what amounts to suburban anonymity.

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The success or failure of Victory Park doesn't just affect Ross Perot Jr. It impacts the entire city, which has partnered with Perot in the project since its inception.

Victory Park is propped up by tax dollars and incentives, even though other developers in surrounding areas have managed to construct their towering condos and office high-rises without public dollars. Of course, Ross Perot Jr. and his father, the billionaire two-time presidential candidate, have a knack for making millions from government contracts.

In 1998, in a referendum that made the recent Trinity tollroad contest look like a fraternity election, Dallas voters narrowly voted to finance $140 million of the cost of the new arena, more than half the project's price tag. At the time, Perot owned the Dallas Mavericks, who along with Dallas Stars, were to be the two main tenants of the facility. Both Perot and Dallas businessman Tom Hicks, who owned the Stars, wound up selling the naming rights of the new arena to American Airlines for $150 million dollars. Now that same arena serves as the main drawing card for Victory Park, a nifty bit of positioning that few businessmen could have wrangled.

Shortly after passage of the arena package, the Dallas City Council voted to hand Perot and Hicks another $25 million to help develop the abandoned property around the arena. The council also created a special financing district for Victory Park that basically redirects the property taxes that Hillwood pays on the project back to the project itself. In other words, while the property taxes paid by most developers go into the general fund to, say, hire police officers and fill up potholes, Victory's taxes finance its own infrastructure costs like road improvements and street lights. This special arrangement, which is limited only to Hillwood-owned or controlled properties, continues until 2012.

City officials are protective of Victory Park. Typically, before they even discuss the district's struggles, they will point out that Victory Park sits on a site formerly occupied by an old railyard and rickety power plant. After Hillwood carted away the contaminated soil, the Environmental Protection Agency designated the site "the nation's largest brownfield cleanup."

Karl Zavitkovsky, the director of the economic development for the city of Dallas, notes the stark improvement. "It was a blighted area and one of the most polluted areas of the city," he says. "They completely transformed it."

The city's annual report on the arena and Victory Park project suggests that city's incentives spurred nearly $1 billion in development from Victory, greatly adding to the taxable value of the once toxic site. As a result, Dallas will more than recoup the tax dollars it redirected into the project, the report concludes.

But other businesses have financed projects in the area without any help from the city. Harwood International, a Dallas-based developer, built Azure, a 31-story luxury condominium tower, in the shadow of Victory Park. The city didn't give Harwood a dime to construct Azure, which now has to compete for buyers with Victory Park.

"Everything around Uptown and Oak Lawn was already booming," says Sharon Boyd, who led the campaign against the arena. "Ross Perot Jr. knew that. That's why he wanted that land."

David Levine, the former Victory Park consultant, thinks that Perot and Hillwood need even more support from the city to make Victory Park work. Merchants on Main Street, for example, receive rent subsidies from Downtown Dallas, a nonprofit booster group that has been funded by the city. The partnership, which only focuses on the traditional downtown core, needs to expand its boundaries and give Victory Park a hand too, he says. "[Perot's] vision will be realized in time as Hillwood refines its strategy and enlists public support."

The North Henderson neighborhood, however, receives no tax advantages from the city. If Victory's every move seems to be choreographed in a corporate boardroom, the North Henderson neighborhood has an offbeat, spontaneous vibe.

Marc Andres, whose family-run company, Andres Properties, controls a good swath of Henderson Avenue, confirms the obvious. His businesses are thriving, and over the last three years, only one restaurant out of the 30 or so in the area has closed.

"You definitely have the feeling that you're in an established neighborhood," he says about why people come to Henderson. "The sense of place is critical; it's not fabricated. We didn't build a new building and make it look old; these are 100-year-old buildings."

Victory Park, on the other hand, looks monumental and can feel overwhelming; as designed, it can't compete with the cozy neighborhood cool of Henderson Avenue or the upscale hip of West Village.

Levine, who has worked on urban projects all over the country, says he has learned a bit about development by working on a project with director George Lucas. "He told me that the key is to make it look like it's not all planned; the key is to make things look and feel real."

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It's a warm Tuesday eveningin January in Ross Perot's district, a little after 8 p.m., but if you didn't know better you'd think ice storm warnings had kept people at home. At nearly every restaurant, the waitstaff seems to outnumber the patrons. At N9NE, the hostess says the kitchen closes at a different time each night, depending on traffic. Tonight, that's 8:15.

This is a trying evening for Victory Park, and it underscores its greatest challenge: How does it survive without a game to rely on? Tonight, like nearly 15 other days this month, there is no event at the AAC. Restaurants might draw patrons on a game or concert night, but on other nights, particularly in the summer months, it's a struggle.

"It was tough, and it still is tough," says Patrick Columbo of Victory Tavern. "You have to work really hard for your base revenue."

There are, however, signs of life. The W Hotel doesn't live or die off the arena and has lived past the white-hot buzz that surrounded its opening. According to the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission, the Ghostbar earned over $5 million in alcohol sales between November 2007 and October 2008. That's a 22 percent drop from the year before but still an impressive tally. Kenichi also draws its share of customers. The sushi restaurant had its best night ever on New Year's Eve when a gala on the plaza drew an astounding 40,000 revelers following the Stars game.

A crowd of 300 also gathered to watch the inauguration of Barack Obama on the plaza's mega-screens. The diverse group instinctively gravitated to Victory Park that morning, which suddenly seemed transformed into a place for public celebration. On other occasions too, when Victory Park shows a movie or college football game on its 30-foot screens, the plaza is vibrant and relevant, like an ultra-modern town square. These types of ordinary gatherings could become one of the defining features of Victory Park—and may help turn the district around.

"That plaza, right now, has become the de facto public meeting space, whether it's to watch New Year's Eve or the inaugural, and Dallas needed that," says developer Sughrue. "It's important to the city, and Victory set out to do that."

Other establishments are hoping that Victory's new office tenants will create enough synergy to boost their business. Haynes and Boone, one of Dallas' largest law firms, recently moved its offices from downtown to One Victory Park, a handsome new building on the southwest corner of the district. Ernst & Young, the prominent accounting firm, is relocating to Victory Park. Hillwood has also added three new restaurants to the district including a reasonably priced Asian eatery and a pizza place. Meanwhile, the Dallas Museum of Nature and Science is scheduled to break ground this year.

If enough people move into Hillwood's residential properties, Victory Park's businesses can feed off each other, in much the same way a pinball ricochets off metal bars. That would help the district reach "critical mass," a phrase heard in nearly every conversation about the development's viability. The critical mass figure, though, is hard to quantify. No one knows exactly when or if the district will have enough people to become a vibrant, bustling community. It's a tricky, chicken-and-egg dynamic too: People won't come to Victory Park unless more businesses open, but more businesses won't open unless more people come. To some, this is an intractable problem, especially if Hillwood doesn't start leasing out more affordable apartments.

"Unless we design mixed-use districts for people of multiple income levels and we have the critical mass of retail and rooftops, [Victory Park's] doomed to be deserted," says Neil Emmons, a city plan commissioner.

While some developers wonder if Hillwood can turn things around, others think that the district, for all its headaches, is simply too big to fail. Eventually, it will achieve that elusive critical mass of retail, restaurants and residents.

"With each building that opens up, it's going to feel more comfortable and more dense, and it's going to start having that sense of place," Sughrue says. "It's way too early to describe Victory as anything more than a work in progress, but if you step back it's remarkable what they've done over there."

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32 comments
Joseph
Joseph

Never been there sounds expensive and snooty; even most rich and snooty people do not like that.

MattP
MattP

That's a great idea though the city would have to give DART ample warning.

But as an experiment why not try it through the summer and fall from 7-12 pm and host a few free concerts and movies there?

Tom Hendricks
Tom Hendricks

My plan for revitalization, would do more with less. It is simple and demands nothing but closing Main street to cars from Downtown, through Deep Ellum, to Fair Park. That pedestrian road would be our �river walk� where people could walk, shop, eat, visit, celebrate etc. Overnight the real estate on that road would become gold. The area on either side almost as precious. And both Downtown and Fair Park would be revitalized.My plan has big drawbacks though - too easy, cost too little, help too many, do too much good - all the things that the provincials in Dallas dislike.Where are the visionaries in this town that know even 101 about city planning?

john moeller
john moeller

We went to victory tavern last friday night, ironically because the wait was too long at a restaurant on henderson. We were charged 12dollars to park. I am not aware of another restaurant in town that charges even half that amount. We wont be back.

MaryBeth McMillon
MaryBeth McMillon

Thank you for pointing out the poor planning that resulted in Houston St., rather than Victory Lane, getting most of the foot traffic from fans heading to the AA Center from the parking lots on the south side of the arena. Not only does Houston St. lack any pedestrian friendly development, its narrow, streetlight and parking meter-filled sidewalk is ill-suited for a couple walking together, much less a crowd.

MaryBeth McMillon
MaryBeth McMillon

Thank you for pointing out the poor planning that resulted in Houston St., rather than Victory Lane, getting most of the foot traffic from fans heading to the AA Center from the parking lots on the south side of the arena. Not only does Houston St. lack any pedestrian friendly development, its narrow, streetlight and parking meter-filled sidewalk is ill-suited for a couple walking together, much less a crowd.

Quia
Quia

I bet if they put an H&M in that old LFT space they'd wake that area up a bit, lol

db
db

Two things - unless I missed it the article should have contained at least one Reference to Medina - a really good, reasonably priced, and cozy place.

Also, Goldy has it right, we've somehow gotten parking way out of wack here in Dallas. Think about all of the places that you like to go and the parking generally sucks. We've got too many big roads and too much parking all over our city, not just in the core.

Jennifer
Jennifer

"Vicotry" as a namesake is no doubt questionable as unless immanent in nature. In which case it is not,(immanent),then more so it becomes Ego-centric... Which is off-putting by everyone. Point one.The reason why North Henderson, (which is in reality is not north but East Dallas hence anything East of 75 ) is popular is that it resonates soulfulness, it is not manufactured, and it has history. It gives opportunity to the creatives according to terms more achievable and room for their own design. There are many things that could have been done with this area of land at Victory Park that sat unused for many, many years. Perhaps due diligence should have included those who inhabited it YEARS ago, who are familiar, who knew the "ICONIC" energy that once existed there, rather than those who clearly did not. The tragic END to West End should have been a clear indicator of outright "commercialism" which has been the detriment to much of the Dallas area.Residential is always key in mixed use, who will inhabit this area and what do they live for. (Richard Florida/ Cultural Creatives) . Where are those today that were once there yesterday? Who asked them? Was there anyone who bothered to do a survey before they spent the tax payers money on what would make sense or did you already know all the answers? To think of putting something "exceptionally exclusive," in an area known for the infamous warehouse cutlure for it's arts and counter culture of yesterday, is clearly ill advised. The energy for it to be successful is simply not there, unless you ASK those who were.

Goldy
Goldy

Dear Developers:

If I hear you use the terms "sense of place" or "Greenwich Village vibe" again, I'm going vomit and then swallow my own bile. Dallas has an area with a whole lotta sense o'place and a its own vibe. It's called Downtown. Yet, you keep building "fake" downtowns on the the periphery and wonder why A) the real downtown is devoid of sucessful retail/restaurants/non-flophouse residential and B) your Truman Show developments have no soul, even sucessful ones like West Village look like Sesame Street. And what will all that chaep stucco construction look like in 50 years-can you say Haltom City?

"But we need convienient parking, this is a car town", I hear you whine. Well guess what? Greenwich Village doesn't have good parking, The French Quarter doesn't have good parking, The Gaslamp in San Diego doesn't have good parking, the whole fucking continent of Europe doesn't have good parking.

We could use the the walk.

Sorry for the rant, now you can proceed to knock down the Robert Johnson building for a new Jason's Deli or somesuch.

holman
holman

The usual rule of thumb among developers concerning projects with high risks but potential high yields is that "the second guy in will make money"--after the first guy goes broke. Concerning Governors Island (NY), Trump says, "The third guy in will make money."

Same is true for Victory Park. The whole cost basis has to be lowered, so retail rents are cheap enough for the mom-n-pops, annd the living spaces are affordable to a wide swath of empty nesters, the young and the half-assed professionals (ha!).

It just needs to go through at least two bankruptcies - which is likely in this environment.

Billy Shafer
Billy Shafer

I do not see what the big surprise is.Anyone with half a brain could have told you it would flop. High end stores where the rich are not going to go makes no sense. Plus the place is hard to get to and in a bad part of town.Next time Hillwood wants to throw money away let me know. I could sure use it.

Francesco Sinibaldi
Francesco Sinibaldi

Something new in my heart.

I'm going tobelieve thateverything shinesin the lightof a footprint,with a lovingdesire, in thesound of thedarkness.....

Francesco Sinibaldi

cliffster
cliffster

One point not made in the story is the really bad service one found in Victory Park when it first opened (maybe now too but I haven't gone back since my first two forays a year ago or so). I travel worldwide and walked into N9ne in Las Vegas once and met friendly people and had a great meal. Tried the same thing at N9NE in Victory Park and confronted aloof and arrogant hostesses who failed to seat us within 90 minutes. Ridiculous. Who cares if the design funnels everybody into the shops and restaurants if what people discover there is pretentious and unsophisticated good and services. Which is what Victory Park is all about. Oak Cliff (Bishop Arts/Fort Worth Avenue) is where it is at. It, Henderson and The Cedars are Dallas's only real hopes for sustainable development. Jacks' Backyard on Fort Worth Avenue sits next to a trailer park and is making more money than all of the restaurants in Victory Park combined.

cliffster
cliffster

One point not made in the story is the really bad service one found in Victory Park when it first opened (maybe now too but I haven't gone back since my first two forays a year ago or so). I travel worldwide and walked into N9ne in Las Vegas once and met friendly people and had a great meal. Tried the same thing at N9NE in Victory Park and confronted aloof and arrogant hostesses who failed to seat us within 90 minutes. Ridiculous. Who cares if the design funnels everybody into the shops and restaurants if what people discover there is pretentious and unsophisticated good and services. Which is what Victory Park is all about. Oak Cliff (Bishop Arts/Fort Worth Avenue) is where it is at. It, Henderson and The Cedars are Dallas's only real hopes for sustainable development. Jacks' Backyard on Fort Worth Avenue sits next to a trailer park and is making more money than all of the restaurants in Victory Park combined.

RE
RE

vic park has crap parking... i am crippled and its even worse for the likes of US

knottygirl
knottygirl

Every time I complain about the disappearing low-income housing near downtown, I get snotty comments about being an East Dallas, anti-progress hippie who would rather live near slums than see an increase in the tax base. Well, this is an extreme example of what happens when housing is way too expensive, restaurants and shops are too pricey, and public transportation doesn't adequately serve an area.

Low-income workers aren't any different from the rest of us. Given a choice to live and shop close to work or far away, they'd rather spare themselves the commute. There are sales clerks and busboys and wait staff and cleaning crews working in those pricey shops and restaurants. Can any of them afford to live, shop, or eat in Victory Park? Until there is a small percentage of subsidized housing in or near Victory Park for the people who work the scut jobs to keep everything shiny and pretty in Victory Park, it will be nothing but a Potemkin village--all show and no substance.

portorro
portorro

I work close to VP and walk over there during lunch.

1. This place feels empty at noon. You can see cars all over 35E (jammed paked) and even Pearl Ave, but none of this traffic gets to this area.(?!!) Why not opening a new exit towards VP from 35E? I am sure that instead of being stuck on 35E many people will rather go and have something to eat or shop at VP.2. Open that station and speed up the green line. I for one, will be using it and may think of spending money over there at regular 8-6PM hours.3. Regardless of traffic, everytime i walk by those shops I feel like...I will have to pay $5000 and will have to give up my first born child for a pair of jeans. This place needs real stores for real people pronto. Dont this people eat like hamburgers? What about an EatZis? Do they go to the grocery store? What about a wholefoods?4.Lastly, its too pretty pretty. And pretty pretty is ugly ugly. It needs to ugly itself a little to look ugly pretty. ;)

H.
H.

This whole area catered to a fake market. Or rather a market where only 5% of the people actually have real money. The thirty-thousandaire's are feeling the hurt of this economy. So buying their costume's and leasing their overpriced cars had to end. Sorry, snotty Dallas developers... maybe you should pack up and move to Austin or Houston; and please take this whole crowd of "followers" with you. Who knew that the name Ghost Bar was really a reference to what this side of town was to become.. a Ghost Town.

Suburban Idiot
Suburban Idiot

"They could maybe see more traffic if people from downtown could take the DART."

That is coming. Victory Station opens for regular business in September, according to DART.

Granted, like someone else mentioned, it would be better if the stop was in the middle of the development, but even a regular stop where the station actually is will be an improvement.

Ralphy
Ralphy

I think a BYOB strip club would help Victory Park.

Anonymous
Anonymous

With repspect to the public financing, don't lose site of the extraordinary costs associated with bringing in City infrastructure (streets, utilities, etc). Your references to success stories on Henderson, or adjacent developments didn't have to shoulder these expenses.

Madeleine Shero
Madeleine Shero

I actually made a very similar and much shorter argument about downtown (and touched on Victory Park) in my blog post: http://cultivationnation.blogs....

I completely agree with what you are saying. Very few people can or want to go out and drop $300 for a Diane von Furstenburg dress or $180 for G Star jeans on a regular basis. I hope that they bring in more mid-level priced stores, but keep them independent. Don't bring in The Gap or Victoria Secret. Mockingbird Station is an example of going too far in that direction.

And open up that Victory Park station for more than just games! Very frustrating to have to drive to get over there. Went to a concert and the station wasn't open then either. They could maybe see more traffic if people from downtown could take the DART.

Branden Helms
Branden Helms

Matt, it is great to see an article published that vindicates what I have been saying about Victory for years, first as an armchair urban planner, and now as a student.

Though you don't directly state it, one point that seems to be proven is that stadiums and arenas don't deliver on the economic development promises made during their elections. While their has been development (only by the same guy who built the arena), it hasn't been what's promised. Looking at recent closures, the arena seems to have done little for the retailers, since they are open all day 6-7 days a week. Game day traffic that is supposed to drive this development is only in the area shortly before and after the event, 100-150 days out of the year. No profitable retailer would set their business model around such an irregular and unpredictable customer base.

Also you mentioned the two design flaws to the Victory development, Victory Park Lane isn't designed to handle pedestrian traffic flow on event days and the lack of visibility of the street itself.

I'll add a third. Back in the day, when DART wanted to build the first part of the upcoming Green Line to service the AAC, they wanted to build it on Houston Street and build the station directly adjacent to the development and arena. The developers, presumably Perot, fought it and wanted it on the edge, between the development and I-35E. The city, in its infinite wisdom decided to side with developers as it always does and denied DART the ability to serve the activity center directly and forced it where it is today.

Thousands of people use that station for events and will never see any retailers, even at full build out. They will see the parking garages for the buildings, however, though that is little consolation for the retailers and very confusing for potential visitors who have to figure out where the spine is for Victory.

This goes back to a fundamental flaw of Dallas trying to become more urban in its core, including Downtown, Uptown, Deep Ellum, Victory, etc. Historically, cities are formed on the ability to generate wealth, ie jobs and economic activity. After that, they will take the shape of the transportation city. When Dallas was served by sreetcars, it was a dense walkable city. Now that it's laced with freeways every few miles, it is a low-density, auto-oriented region.

While DART's light rail system is making inroads in this area, the region is still dominated by the auto, because it was built to. American's don't love their cars as the common stereotype goes. It is a transportation tool and for the vast majority of this area, it is the only viable and efficient tool available.

This pertains to Victory in a big way. Since the urban core was built prior to the auto, it is not as convenient for the car. Since the suburbs were built around the car, they are more convenient. If people want to buy something upscale, it is more convenient to go to North Park than Victory. In essence, no place near the urban core will be able to outsuburb the suburbs. They can easily out urban them if they try, but they don't as much as they should. (I may need to tap the brakes a little on out-urbaning the suburbs. Some of them are figuring out how to do urban, like downtown Plano and Galatyn Park in Richardson, which actively use the Red Line Stations adjacent to drive the development)

While there are lots of urban amenities in Victory, a big flaw is its reliance on the car. By putting the train station so far out of the development, it exacerbated that problem. That along with what you mentioned about Houston Street, basically being the loading dock for Victory, has made Victory undesireable to the urban and suburban population.

chris von danger
chris von danger

The main issue with Victory Park is it will not embrace big or value name business to bring in the local/visitor foot traffic, most of that is due to the eliteist attitude of Ross Jr and Hillwood, who think anyone who dines at a Fridays or Chili's is too low rent for their taste. Chef Tim Love was about to open a branch of Love Shack Burgers there and couldnt get these guys to give him a straight answer on the property. If ESPNZone, Hard Rock or any business similar to their model decided to open a location in the area, the business would be through the roof on game/concert nights, not to mention pull in the locals on off nights.

Jake
Jake

This is a great article. As an example, I live in Oak Cliff so when restaurants started opening in the Bishop Arts area and beyond I was sure to support them, tell my friends about them, or take my friends to support them. My friends who live in downtown did the same for their burgeoning scene as have the folks near Henderson and in Uptown. Who are the advocates for the Victory area? As of now it�s just the North West End; A more expensive, shiny, contrived destination place for out-of-towners.

Sherri Hughes
Sherri Hughes

I live in the complex Jefferson @ the Northend,which I guess technically is not a part of "Victory Park". However, I think the success of the area depends a lot on the residents of this complex. The complex probably has the most diverse residents in the area, both financially and culturally. In the future this area has to meet the needs of such a diverse group, which would also mirror the diverse group that patronizes the AAC. What about a movie theatre, upscale bowling(Tin Pin Alley)chic low priced retail(forever 21/ H&M) and low end quality restaurants(Five Guys-hamburgers/Wing stop)-these options could work well with high end boutiques and restaurants.

Bob
Bob

Two problems: lousy, unaffordable, close parking and too expensive shops and restaurants.

james conway
james conway

Wow where to one starts, Its one of the reasons for leaving that city. You have the rich and then you have the rich who thinks there's only the rich. Then the rich turn around and dont even do business with each other because they know exactly what each other is offering and they dont want it cause they dont like it. Can any one say "BOREDOM"Well if you can, say it loud enough and in repetition because most people in Dallas dont have a clue what fun is and creativity is all about. "Change" would be a good new word for that group. Cahnge and fast. The ones making those decisions are the same ones who think BMWs rule. Well they are nice but flavor is good too. Motorcyles are not bad either. "You feel me Dallas?"Oh well i will not be the one giving away ideas for free.Keep searching Dallas and hopefully you will hit the Barn.

Victory wannabe
Victory wannabe

Victory will not survive without condo landowners who care about their neighborhood and investment. Renters and flippers do not make a stable neighborhood or foundation for future growth. Therfore a simple solution is for Victory to quit trying to over think and over due sucessful models. You need to (subsidize if you have to) have a Victory grocery store, and assorted real service stores (pharmacy, doctors, cleaners etc) within Victory so residents can walk and shop. Have all of these subsidized comapnies provide delivery services (even doctors) for residents etc. Look at any NY neighborhood and even North Dallas neighborhodd to see what has worked for generations. Victory developers needed to check in their egos a long ago along with their crazy LA/NY condo price structures. Even before the Cali crash you could get a sizeable 2 bedroom water view condo along the coast of West Los Angesles for 700K yet for the same price I could only find a 1 bedroom overlooking the County Jail...Come On!

wick olson
wick olson

so do they plan to renovate Victory Park to make it more attractive?

Steven R
Steven R

I;m sure it'll achieve critical mass someday. After all, look at West End. Well... wait a minute... Never mind.

 
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