"He went to pull it and Carter shot him," Moffitt says. "He shot and then ran."

The single bullet to the chest killed Marton. His girlfriend, Monica Stafford, later picked Carter out of a lineup, and cell phone records along with testimony from Carter linked everything back to Demus, who had placed the Craigslist ad in the first place.

On February 4, 2009, Demus was convicted of capital murder and sentenced to life in prison. Carter pleaded guilty to first-degree murder, but he has yet to be sentenced. Moffitt says "it's reaching" to place any blame on Craigslist for providing Demus and Carter the opportunity to commit their crime. "Criminals do the crimes, not advertisements."

Craigslist creator Craig Newmark and CEO Jim Buckmaster are weathering a storm of criticism that their successful digital classified site is promoting illicit activity.
Gene X. Hwang
Craigslist creator Craig Newmark and CEO Jim Buckmaster are weathering a storm of criticism that their successful digital classified site is promoting illicit activity.
Katherine Olson searched the nanny listings on Craigslist.org, and responded to an ad for a babysitter. When she arrived at the home of what she supposed was a young family, she was greeted by her killer.
courtesy of the Olson Family
Katherine Olson searched the nanny listings on Craigslist.org, and responded to an ad for a babysitter. When she arrived at the home of what she supposed was a young family, she was greeted by her killer.

But only six weeks after Demus' conviction, another suspect allegedly availed himself of that opportunity. On an unseasonably snowy March 20 in New York City, George Weber—a passionate, affable 47-year-old radio newsman—posted a Craigslist ad looking for rough sex.

His solicitation was answered promptly by 16-year-old John Katehis, a self-described sadomasochist and Satanist who lived with his separated parents in the East Elmhurst neighborhood of Queens. "I can smother somebody for $60," he wrote to Weber. In the context of what was to be a sadomasochistic romp, Katehis' aggressive reply failed to raise red flags.

The two met in Brooklyn and made their way to Weber's first-floor brownstone apartment in Carroll Gardens. There, Katehis allegedly stabbed Weber some 50 times in the neck and torso. The teen stripped off his bloodied clothes, put on a clean pair of jeans and T-shirt purloined from Weber's wardrobe, and hopped the G train back to Queens. When police arrested Katehis at a friend's house in Upstate New York, he was still wearing Weber's clothes.

About three weeks later, on April 14, Philip Markoff—a tall, blond, 23-year-old med student at Boston University—came across an Erotic Services ad on Craigslist posted by 26-year-old Bronx-based call girl Julissa Brisman. Markoff sent her an e-mail, and the two arranged a soirée at the Marriott Copley Hotel in Boston's upscale Back Bay district. Seconds after entering the room, Markoff allegedly pounced on Brisman, who, according to a medical examiner, fought back tenaciously. Markoff stands accused of shooting Brisman three times—twice in the torso, once in the hip—killing her.

Markoff was with his fiancée, on their way to Foxwoods Casino in Connecticut, when he was pulled over and arrested just south of Boston on Interstate 95. The summa cum laude graduate of the State University of New York-Albany was later implicated in a similar Boston robbery, as well as one in Warwick, Rhode Island. A common thread ran through all three crimes: young women solicited through Craigslist's Erotic Services category.

Even more than the Weber slaying, the Markoff arrest captured the public imagination. How could somebody like Markoff—clean-cut, well-educated, ambitious and in the midst of planning a beachside wedding this summer—do such a thing? Lacking any other hook, the national press dubbed Markoff "the Craigslist Killer," a phrase that still makes Newmark and Buckmaster cringe.

"We're taken aback any time we hear that term used," Buckmaster says. "Although, if you stop and think about it, it's a testament to how exceedingly rare violent crime is on Craigslist, when you consider that it's the most common way that Americans are meeting each other these days by a significant margin. The reason they don't call him 'the Handgun Killer' or 'the Boston Killer' or 'the Hotel Killer' is because thousands of homicides have involved those factors."

The Weber and Brisman murders couldn't have come at a worse time for Craigslist. Just as the crimes were splashing into primetime news segments, a sheriff in Chicago was mounting a campaign against the company.

Cook County Sheriff Tom Dart first made headlines in October when he announced he was suspending all foreclosure evictions in his jurisdiction. The energetic state representative-turned-sheriff was fed up with throwing law-abiding people out on the streets.

By March, Dart was onto a new cause: Craigslist. He filed a federal lawsuit against the site, accusing it of "facilitating prostitution." He claims that, during the last two years, his department has arrested more than 200 Craigslist users on charges ranging from prostitution to juvenile pimping and human trafficking.

"In the hundreds of arrests that we've made, never have we had one where we went under the guise that it's a massage and it turned out that it was just a massage," Dart says. "We know what's going on."

Despite Dart's confident tone, most legal experts believe his lawsuit has little chance of success—a clause in the Communications Decency Act immunizes Web sites from liability for content posted by third parties. The goal is to ensure robust free speech, says Matt Zimmerman, an attorney with the Electronic Frontier Foundation. "We don't want to have to make Web sites actively monitor what goes on, because that would drive up costs, and you would have every site saying, 'You know what, it's not worth it; we're not going to allow people to talk to each other at all.'"

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