Pet Sounds

Animal psychic Sonya Fitzpatrick hears voices, the dog and cat kind.

Pet Sounds
CHRIS CURRY

Sonya Fitzpatrick lies on a bed surrounded by her seven cats and five dogs. Dressed in a red blouse with matching red nail polish, blue jeans, gold hoop earrings and a gold necklace, Fitzpatrick, who's inside her Conroe home that's shaded by towering pine trees, is on the phone conducting a pet psychic session.

"I would suggest you get down on your hands and knees and walk around the furniture, darling," Fitzpatrick says in an unmistakable British accent. On a nearby nightstand is a photo of Fitzpatrick with Ellen DeGeneres at the television personality's home in the Southern California hills. Fitzpatrick's clients, who range from A-list famous people to folks who live in trailer parks, pay her $300 per half hour to descramble the thoughts and feelings of their animals.

During this particular phone consultation, Fitzpatrick is communicating with a blind dog named Max, a chow chow who keeps bumping his head into the furniture. The pet owner, instead of taking the advice of a traditional veterinarian to equip the animal with a helmet, has decided to consult with the famous pet psychic.

Like a cross between Dr. Doolittle and Miss Cleo, East Texan Sonya Fitzpatrick says she can talk to the animals, mind to mind.
Chris Curry
Like a cross between Dr. Doolittle and Miss Cleo, East Texan Sonya Fitzpatrick says she can talk to the animals, mind to mind.
The former fashion model counsels her clients psychically from her home in Conroe, often in bed, which she shares here with a collection of furry friends.
Chris Curry
The former fashion model counsels her clients psychically from her home in Conroe, often in bed, which she shares here with a collection of furry friends.

"Now, walk around the furniture because [the dog] will be able to pick up the pictures that you're projecting," continues the 71-year-old, English-born Fitzpatrick, a former fashion model who could still turn a few heads. "Max just said, 'I can find my food and my water dish!' He also says, 'Mum worries all of the time about me.' And now he's telling me that he loves the fact that you're all going to walk on all fours like he does!"

Fitzpatrick, the pioneer of mainstream pet psychiatry, has become a full-blown celebrity thanks to her self-proclaimed ability to telepathically communicate with dogs, cats, birds, frogs and snakes. Once the messages are decoded, she relays the information to animal owners.

Because she has become so good at accessing the "magnetic fields in which animals project their thoughts and feelings," just about all of her consultations are by phone only. She says that even without a photograph of a pet, she can decipher what's going on inside of an animal's mind in order to further bond animals with their "human companions."

Fitzpatrick's so-called gift isn't limited to household dogs and cats. Unsolved Mysteries once hired her to talk to an ailing racehorse, and Fitzpatrick's diagnosis turned out to be spot-on. More recently, a circus had her communicate with an unhappy tiger, who told her that he would rather enjoy the last few months of his life than undergo chemotherapy. (The tiger was left alone and died four months later.) Fitzpatrick claims that she can communicate with bears and autistic children too.

Fitzpatrick, who believes that traditional veterinary medicine is the predominant cause of animal disease, asserts that she can also talk to dead animals. Many of her clients ("mostly women and gay men," says Fitzpatrick) as well as callers to her Sirius XM radio show, which challenges Howard Stern in terms of phone traffic, seek out Fitzpatrick to talk to animals that have crossed to the other side.

There's no doubting that Fitzpatrick, who says that she has "never met an animal that isn't spiritual," is cognizant of animal behavior. However, in a women-dominated field that didn't professionally exist until two decades ago, it remains impossible to prove if she (or anyone else, for that matter) can really figure out what animals are thinking and feeling.

Not surprisingly, college-educated veterinarians are quick to point out that pet psychiatry is a pseudoscience that's on a par with a "party trick," according to one Houston-area veterinarian.

However, at least one traditional animal doctor at Texas A&M University's College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences—one of North America's most renowned educational, medical and research institutions for animal medicine—thinks that "maybe there is some truth" to animal communication.


Fitzpatrick, seated at the dining room table of her family's English farmhouse, stares at her friends that have been cooked and served on a dinner plate. She's 14 and her farmer father has slaughtered and prepared a Christmas Day feast that includes the three geese that Sonya had telepathically spoken with on a daily basis.

Decades after the Association for Research and Enlightenment, founded by the psychic Edgar Cayce, claimed it discovered the possibility of human-animal communications, Fitzpatrick says she was naturally talking to animals. She grew up surrounded by free-range chickens, pigs and ducks in the English countryside, where her father and uncle owned farms. Fitzpatrick grew especially close to Daisy, Primrose and Buttercup, a trio of fowl she would tell to show up outside of the school gate so that they could walk her home from class.

Because of Fitzpatrick's rural upbringing, she bore witness to all sorts of farm killings. When this happened, she could feel the pains that the animals were suffering. To this day, when she's performing a psychic reading for a pet that has died, she'll feel its physical discomfort.

"If they couldn't walk, I would feel that, too," says Fitzpatrick, who extends her arms to demonstrate that, during pet psychic sessions, they model an animal's front legs while her legs are a pet's hindquarters. "I'll feel a discomfort in my abdomen area if they had a problem with the stomach. If they had a nail cut too short, I would feel discomfort in my nail. I use every part of my body, really.

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12 comments
cp
cp

I wonder if you told her first that you had a lab or a cocker spaniel or another dog breed that is prone to various sorts of "ear problems"? I mean, if someone told me that they had a Dalmatian, I might later ask if it suffers from skin problems. The list goes on and on.

Leslie Razien
Leslie Razien

I have had several readings with Sonya in the last few years. I have no doubt as she is the "real deal". The things she says are so specific and there is no way she could know or guess these things. And, as icing on the cake, many of my relatives that have passed have over popped in during our sessions. This woman is Amazing and I am very happy that she is able to share her gift with others!!!

James
James

One of my relatives supposedly does this.

oldpatchie
oldpatchie

I would like her to talk to my ASS poor old thing is old and tired

dertymindz
dertymindz

My tube-snake has been acting up lately. Wonder if she can help?

Paco Jamal Warner
Paco Jamal Warner

"Fitzpatrick claims that she can communicate with bears and autistic children too."

That'll come in handy if I'm ever being mauled by a bear or get trapped inside an episode of "St. Elsewhere".

HeidiF
HeidiF

This is just silly -- and we have PLENTY of serious things we could be talking about that would actually help our companion animals in Dallas. For instance, why does Dallas Animal Services have to ask for donations of supplies and for volunteers to help out when our tax dollars should be paying for humane and compassionate care for the animals they take in. And, when will the city of Dallas stop euthanizing thousands of animals a month and start working on real spay-neuter programs and finding homes for the one they have? Hey, D.O., with Mark Donald leaving, it's like you've taken leave of your senses.

Sinibaldi
Sinibaldi

The wind blowing in the sun.

In the chirpingof a delicatebird there's alight that alwaysshines nearthe sound ofa quietness, it'sthe tender reliefnow recallingthe youth.

Francesco Sinibaldi

Schrödinger
Schrödinger

Can she tell if a cat in a steel box is alive or not? Please get back to me. It's kind of important.

Doggy Lama
Doggy Lama

Yes, I do become quite amused when some people are taken for a ride by Television Pastards. Basically, if people are willing to believe in television miracles, they deserve the consequences. Of course, I don't appreciate the elderly being a target of this recalcitrant behavior, but most others are fair game.

Psychics are no different. But, psychics for dogs? Come on.

I have been known to hand out business cards to pretentious psychological fucks at various mental health conferences to break the monotony of name tag examination. "Canine Hypnotherapy and Psychodrama" It is amusing to watch the contorted faces that follow.

If I were to open such a clinic, I could easily milk the patient owners. I could ask the owner to assist in obtaining an informed consent paw print. Then, I could ask them to leave the room. Confidentiality is very important. If the patient were to show no progress or regression, I could blame this on "resistance." I might do this. I could call myself a Specialist in Canine Psychotherapy.

JJ
JJ

Anyone ever hear about the dislexic agnostic? He always wondered if there was a Dog.......

 
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