As far as Anchía's concerned, through, exonerees are in good shape at present: They're compensated well, and the newly signed law protects their money from attorneys ready to take a few pennies off each dollar earned the hard way. But if Combs wants to keep looking at the issue, well, that's fine by him too.

Steven Phillips served 24 years in prison for a sexual assault he didn't commit. Now free, he stands to receive $4.1 million in restitution from the state but is suing his former lawyer, Kevin Glasheen, who claims he's owed a quarter of that amount.
AP Photo/LM Otero
Steven Phillips served 24 years in prison for a sexual assault he didn't commit. Now free, he stands to receive $4.1 million in restitution from the state but is suing his former lawyer, Kevin Glasheen, who claims he's owed a quarter of that amount.
Innocence Project of Texas chief counsel Jeff Blackburn (left) celebrates with Charles Chatman in 2008 as Chatman leaves a Dallas courtroom cleared of a wrongful rape conviction that put Chatman behind bars for 27 years. Chatman paid Glasheen 25 percent of the money he received from Texas in compensation post-exoneration. Blackburn, meanwhile, has collected hundreds of thousands of dollars in "referral fees" for sending Innocence Project clients to private lawyers.
AP Photo/Tim Sharp
Innocence Project of Texas chief counsel Jeff Blackburn (left) celebrates with Charles Chatman in 2008 as Chatman leaves a Dallas courtroom cleared of a wrongful rape conviction that put Chatman behind bars for 27 years. Chatman paid Glasheen 25 percent of the money he received from Texas in compensation post-exoneration. Blackburn, meanwhile, has collected hundreds of thousands of dollars in "referral fees" for sending Innocence Project clients to private lawyers.

"Right now, we have the right policies in place to prevent abuse and get wrongfully convicted Texans the compensation they deserve," he says. "If the speaker of the House convenes a study group, I'll want to be part of that. But my sense is, we have the policies in place to cover if not all of the cases, then certainly 99.99 percent of them."

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12 comments
You may say I'm a dreamer
You may say I'm a dreamer

Um, who's the ones being greedy?!?! I'll wager no suit would've been filed against Glasheen if he had been reasonable in his compensation demands.

You may say I'm a dreamer
You may say I'm a dreamer

No one is saying that lawyers should'n't be paid. But these lawyers hoodwinked the innocent, who, after decades sitting in prison, did not have the wherewithal to understand the contracts they signed with the lawyer and probably trusted the Innocence Project lawyer who referred them.to Glasheen. Really, no amount of money can give them back the years they lost and the trauma of what they've experienced.

You may say I'm a dreamer
You may say I'm a dreamer

These lawyers misrepresented themselves. Blackburn was allegedly working as a representative of the Innocence Project, but he used that organizations resources to cherry pick the best cases for his buddy, Glasheen, who gave him the agreed upon kickback. They're in this mess because they've overreached. No, working for free is not something lawyers do, but naked greed and exploitative practices like this should be reined in.

Nokilljoe
Nokilljoe

Lawyer Randy Turner stated he was only charging the three clients his going rate of $300/hr. His going rate is actually $250/hr. He stated this in court two weeks ago to a judge. He's even ripping off his own clients. Ever since tort reform his business has been way down. That's why he's been doing some pro-bono work. Odd he's not helping out these three clients for free. They were innocent. One pro-bono client was Steven Woods the fake lraqi war veteran whose dog bit two elderly people. Turner lost the case but helped Woods bilk people out of donations. He's also representing a woman who committed animal cruelty pro-bono. She owns property and her husband is an engineer. Turner doesn't charge her but he does charge three innocent men with no money? Turner wants part of the big compensation just like the other lawyers. Greedy lawyers all of them.

Exonr8
Exonr8

That's absurd. One case is obviously litigation, the other some would be slick lobbying in Austin...or whatever. Now, you figure out which case a Texas Attorney should be involved in. Haha. Thank you verry much.

glittermama
glittermama

So lawyers are scumbags ! What else is new?

Azlemolly
Azlemolly

how many people do you know who work for free?

Cp9193
Cp9193

So lawyers are scumbags! What else is new?

Maria
Maria

Buy and read Tested by Dorothy and Peyton Budd on the subject of wrongly convicted men in Texas.

Hugh
Hugh

"I take it from the comments I see that the deadbeats here on this posting believe that attorneys are supposed to work for free. Do you work for free? Does your doctor? Your plumber? Your mechanic?" No, of course not. But then people expect teachers and government workers to labor for next to nothing, so why not attorneys? Or doctors?

Hugh
Hugh

It's not a question of the DNA not matching because the sample has degraded with time. Absence of a match is not proof that someone else did it. Texas has many people still in prison for whom the DNA proves they weren't the rapist, but it can't exclude them from being present at the crime scene, so they continue to serve time. The samples in this case were good enough to 1) exclude Phillips and 2) to implicate someone else. You should not be worried that we might erroneously freeing a guilty man, you should be concerned about the number of innocent people who have been convicted and later proven to be innocent. From the founding of this country we long held the view that it was preferable to free a hundred guilty men to wrongly convicting a single innocent man, but now we seem not to care that we regularly convict the innocent and those who do are dismissed as "liberals".

 
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