Contagion: Time for Widespread Panic

Steven Soderbergh turns the star-studded Hollywood disaster flick on its head.

Currently the fifth-to-last film on Steven Soderbergh's ever-expanding pre-retirement slate, Contagion opens on day two of a global viral epidemic. Gwyneth Paltrow plays Beth Emhoff, an American employee for an ominously unspecific multinational corporation who returns from a business trip in Hong Kong to her wintry Midwestern home feeling like crap. Twenty-four hours after she's written off her sickness as jet lag in a phone call to her never-seen lover, Beth starts convulsing and foaming at the mouth. She's pronounced dead at the hospital, and before her husband, Mitch (Matt Damon), can make it home to break the news to their young son, the kid follows suit. Soon jet-setters the world over are literally breaking into sweat simultaneously.

Beth is fingered as Patient Zero of a virus previously unseen on earth, which kills its victims within hours of the onset of symptoms and defies cure, containment or scientific understanding. Hospitals and streets fill with the zombie sick, and the social order breaks down almost instantly.

In fine Irwin "Master of Disaster" Allen style, Soderbergh deploys a cast of thousands to help sketch the epidemic as a global, class-blind, all-encompassing event. Marion Cotillard is the adorable WHO epidemiologist assigned to trace the origins of Beth's illness by piecing together her last hours. Laurence Fishburne is the CDC chief who sends deputy Kate Winslet to manage the crisis on the ground while he hunkers down at headquarters and tries to manage the message — a fight thwarted when conspiracy blogger Jude Law posts a video of a Japanese businessman collapsing on a city bus, which feeds a global panic that turns survivors like Mitch into hyper-paranoid shut-ins.

They weren't kidding when they said employees must wash hands before returning to work.
They weren't kidding when they said employees must wash hands before returning to work.

Details

Contagion Directed by Steven Soderbergh. Written by Scott Z. Burns. Starring Gwyneth Paltrow, Matt Damon, Marion Cotillard, Laurence Fishburne, Kate Winslet, Jude Law, Bryan Cranston, Elliott Gould, John Hawkes, Demetri Martin and Jennifer Ehle.

Speed itself is both a key Contagion theme and the film's defining aesthetic characteristic. Crafting staccato montages to a coolly insistent drum, bass and piano score, Soderbergh transitions between his interwoven stories at a rapid-fire pace, allowing a couple of seemingly major characters to disappear for long stretches and one to die with a startling lack of sentimentality.

Contagion is very much a Steven Soderbergh movie — as self-conscious a Hollywood entertainment as his Ocean's trilogy, and as microscopically attuned to its moment as his 2009 experimental sketch of the economic crisis, The Girlfriend Experience. It is also part 1970s star-studded and story-bloated disaster movie and part 1870s satire-as-serialized-soap-opera, a pulp-pop confection with an unusually serious-minded social critique at its heart. Think The Towering Inferno, as done by Anthony Trollope.

Trollope's 1875 doorstop novel, The Way We Live Now, is an apt point of reference not just because its title could sub for the one Soderbergh and screenwriter Scott Z. Burns chose. But also, Trollope's masterpiece turned a pop-culture craze — serialized novels that used real locomotive crashes as the starting point for ensemble soap operas — on its head. There's no actual train crash in The Way We Live Now; instead, the "railway disaster" is perpetrated by a con artist who convinces all of London society, high on the 19th century's ultimate symbol of "progress" to invest in a railway that will never be built. Greed and hypocrisy spread, well, virally, in the wake of technological change, and before you know it, society has collapsed on itself. Soderbergh similarly takes on pop Hollywood forms specifically to make them his own, and like The Way We Live Now, Contagion exists to trace the chain reaction caused by isolated acts of selfishness, unchecked power and a never-sated culture of newer, faster, better.

An act of promiscuity might cause the virus' initial spread across continents, but Contagion implies that risky sex has nothing, long-term consequences wise, on the risky high-speed transfer of information. In a world in which grief is expressed via texted emoticon before the body is buried, and Web celebrities cause riot-panics as stocks spike with their blog hype, meme control becomes the official form of damage control. "Social distancing," the name given to the CDC's policy of virus containment via forced isolation of the healthy, is not just the literal opposite of "social networking," but its potential endgame. At what point in the near future will we all stop leaving the house?

As prolific a worker as any in contemporary Hollywood, Soderbergh claims to be on the verge of packing in his own career, which gives his movie a pretty interesting subtextual twist: Work, in Contagion, is fraught with mortal peril. The first victims are business travelers, while Damon's stay-at-home dad is spared and even turned into one of the film's least ambiguous heroes. If Contagion truly is the first leg of Soderbergh's retirement victory lap, this harrowing film is a potent reminder of what we stand to lose.

 
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2 comments
Omegarod
Omegarod

Why cant someone just review a friggen movie any more? What the hell kind of review was that?

Titus Groan
Titus Groan

Don't forget to bring your bottle of hand sanitizer to the movie.

 

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