Available for viewing only in select cinemas in major cities (the rest will feature a standard 24-frame presentation), this "high-frame rate" Hobbit features exceptionally sharp, plasticine images the likes of which we might never have seen on a movie screen before, but which do resemble what we see all the time on our HD television screens, whether it's Sunday Night Football, Dancing With the Stars, or a game of Grand Theft Auto. (Indeed, most TVs now have a menu setting that can, if you so desire, lend this look to everything you watch — a setting appropriately christened by some gearheads as the "soap opera effect.") Whereas video-shot "films" have labored for years to approximate the look of celluloid, Jackson goes whole hog in the opposite direction, the idea being that this acute video quality comes closer to the way the human eye perceives reality. Fair enough, but the reality Jackson conjures isn't quite the one he intends: Instead of feeling like we've been transported to Middle-Earth, it's as if we've dropped in on Jackson's New Zealand set, trapped in an endless "making of" documentary, waiting for the real movie to start.

Details

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey

Directed by Peter Jackson.

Written by Fran Walsh, Philippa Boyens, Peter Jackson and Guillermo del Toro. Based on the novel by J.R.R. Tolkien. Starring Martin Freeman, Ian McKellen, Richard Armitage and Andy Serkis

.

Related Stories

More About

For the record, I returned to see The Hobbit a second time, at 24 frames, and found it more aesthetically pleasing but no more dramatically engaging. At any speed, the movie only springs to full life late in the day, during the first meeting of Bilbo and the tragic creature who will come to be known as Gollum (once again played by the sublime Andy Serkis), a creature reduced to a quivering, schizophrenic mass by his fidelity to a certain gold ring. Suddenly, in one long scene consisting of nothing more than two characters trying to outwit each other in a game of riddles, Jackson the storyteller seems to overtake Jackson the technocrat. The old magic returns, and for a fleeting moment, The Hobbit feels truly necessary, a triumph of art over commerce.

« Previous Page
 |
 
1
 
2
 
All
 
My Voice Nation Help
2 comments
getawaysticks
getawaysticks

Didn't Del Toro step down from the project, and Peter Jackson stepped in? He didn't kick Del Toro out of the project (like Leno did).

Sotiredofitall
Sotiredofitall topcommenter

Correct - Del Toro became tired of waiting for production to start (remember there was some legal/financial wrangling).   I think most of the reviews on this site are now written for the benefit of other reviewers (you know "hey look at me") and are less and less written for general consumption.

 

Now Showing

Find capsule reviews, showtimes & tickets for all films in town.

Powered By VOICE Places

Box Office

Scores provided by Rotten Tomatoes

Join My Voice Nation for free stuff, film info & more!

Loading...