A Better Way on the Trinity Highway

Let's build a road on the river, not a wall.

Let's be real, for a change, about the debate over building an eight-lane highway along the river at the western border of downtown. Sometimes we say it's a question of traffic needs or flood control or parks. It's not.

This is about the one thing everything is about sooner or later in Dallas — real estate development. On any given day all the other arguments get turned upside down, tossed out and resurrected like cue cards. The plan for an eight-lane toll road inside the flood control levees along the Trinity River has always been about the long-held dream of powerful interests in the city to redevelop an obsolete industrial and warehouse district between the river and downtown.

So what if we talked about that for a change? Would building a new highway along the river create or enable the redevelopment of the land along the river? Would it get the job done?

Daniel Fishel

I first saw the outline of a redeveloped Stemmons Corridor Industrial district eight years ago, expressed in a series of large renderings on the walls of the conference room at Halff Associates Inc., the Dallas-based civil engineering firm that had a lot to do with putting together the original concept. Halff is a firm well known and respected for its work in the areas of flood control and earth-moving but perhaps not the first to be chosen today for major urban land-use planning and redesign.

But some people who are experts in those areas think at least some of the Halff concept was right. For example, their renderings showed dense high-rise development along the river. Last week I talked to Larry Beasley of Vancouver, the international city designer who is working on our Trinity River questions in between other things like helping redesign Moscow. In some ways Beasley's vision of a redeveloped Stemmons corridor mirrored what I saw all those years ago on the conference room walls at Halff.

Beasley said the big thing is being up high enough to be able to see the river over the tops of the levees. Otherwise the river and the greenbelt don't exist as far as adjacent development is concerned.

"There's one thing that seems absolutely evident to me," he said. "The sites near the Trinity need very high density. We need to get buildings up beyond the levees so that from a market point of view you can really enjoy the added value of being adjacent to the Trinity recreation corridor, particularly as it's further developed."

So Halff got at least half of it right. But what about that highway? What can explain the relentless obsession of the powers-that-be in Dallas with putting a new highway right between the land they want to redevelop and next to the river and greenbelt they want to develop?

No one will ever say it out loud, but if you fly up to a bird's-eye view and look down on the land in question, the basic rationale stands out in black and white. The proposed Trinity River toll road is two things: It is an exclusive dedicated ingress and egress for the land to be developed. And it is a wall.

All sorts of important cultural assumptions are embedded in the design. One is that the river itself, long viewed as a sewer, is at best of tertiary arms-length importance — a thing to be seen from windows but never touched. Another is that both the location and access to the location will be more attractive to the extent they are exclusive. The most profound and encompassing assumption is that value is enhanced by separation, that less valuable land corrodes higher value land by incursion. Therefore higher value land must be physically isolated behind walls.

So if that's what we're really talking about, why don't we talk about it? Does the real agenda of exclusive access stand on its own merits? Will a new freeway along the river enhance values next to the river? And what if the answer were no?

In 17 years of writing about this project I have become convinced you could prove to Dallas that the highway will kill the proposed parks along the river, make traffic worse and cause serious flooding problems, but if people thought nevertheless it would enhance property values, they'd call it a good trade. Hey, we're in the West. Settlers here thought the possibility of having their hearts ripped from their chests by Comanches was a fair trade-off for good farmland.

But what if the road won't enhance values? What if, in fact, the road will take what might otherwise be a huge real estate play and reduce it to a fizzle? Dallas might listen to that.

Or here's another possibility: Maybe the strictly binary choice offered here by Jim Schutze — either the road helps or the road hurts — is dismissive of myriad possibilities in between. Why couldn't there be some crazily original design out there that accomplished a bunch of things at once, shipping those rich folks in and out of the new Hanging Gardens of Babylon like sardines in a fish plant but also allowing Schutze and his hippie friends to go play ukuleles and weave dandelion necklaces for each other on the riverbanks?

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17 comments
ozonelarryb
ozonelarryb

Schutze and friends uke-ing it out with a bonfire and smores...I'd ppv that. Prob show up too.

Seriously, does anyone really think this thing will not get drowned during construction?

d-may
d-may

I've heard you give you "It's about land development" spiel before, and I don't get it. I just don't see how you think that they think this will help sell condos. Yes, the powers that be would like to redevelop the chunk of industrial/river front blvd, but this road isn't going to help that. 

I don't think you are crazy. Land development is a major reason why road are built in North Texas. But that's the case NORTH of I-30. South of I-30 different rules apply. This road is built for the same reason that I-45 was built. (Side note: did you know much of I-45 was also built in a flood plain?) I-45 was built to get good white people through South Dallas as fast as possible. There is no land development going on out there. It's built for one reason -to move cars through South Dallas as fast as possible. 

That's the reason for the Trinity Toll Road. It's a redundant road that is designed to move people who don't mind paying tolls as fast as possible from the northern 'burbs to I-45 and onto Houston.

You are wrong on this one. This one isn't about land development. 

All the more reason for it not to happen. 

atosbarn
atosbarn

During the all-but-forgotten Trinity River Corridor Citizens Committee (which began circa 1994) meetings, it quickly became apparent that the actual citizens were there just to put lipstick on the pig of a process that ultimately was directed by city staff and developers.  One of the options the CITIZENS' committee had proposed was a low-speed parkway on the inside of the levees, that was aimed at providing access to facilities in the river bottom.  However, the final report published by the CITY bore no resemblance to the report that the citizens had worked on.  This is of course now all water under the (white PVC pipe & string) bridge, to coin a phrase, but I thought I'd remind folks that the duplicity around the toll-road goes back a long way. And speaking of deceptiveness, who here remembers the pictures of sailboats on the Trinity used by toll-road proponents in campaigning for the Trinity River Project bond campaign in 1998?

Montemalone
Montemalone topcommenter

I'm seeing a road under the river, with a big glass dome over it. Kind of like a reverse glass bottom boat. When your stuck in traffic, look up at all the cool stuff floating by overhead.


WhiteWhale
WhiteWhale

Why not a Boston Big Dig on steroids?  That was only about 14 Billion.  Elevated highway and tunnels under the existing bridges.  Why let a little thing like tax payer money stand in the way of a world class project?  That's what Dallas bond issues are for

baker24
baker24

I can see no way the Corps of Engineers will approve any bermed, landscaped parkway type road. The ONLY type of road inside the levees that will not result in a critical raising of the flood levels will be a viaduct, essentially a bridge carrying the highway above the river bed inside the levees, supported on a jillion pilings and extending for several miles from the Bachman area to 175. It will be interesting to see them try to get that past the Margaret Hunt Hill bridge and the other bridges over the Trinity while keeping it above the maximum flood levels. Considering the presence of extensive sand deposits in the Trinity bottoms, the Corps of Engineers will almost certainly have to ensure the pilings for any highway will have to be at a distance from the base of the levee system to prevent any weakening of the levees due to water incursion from the drilling operations for the pilings. That in turn will reduce or eliminate needed space for the park amenities we all were told would be built. Certainly building a several mile long viaduct will create a wall that will separate Dallas from the river forever: how will people in Dallas access the river with an elevated highway blocking the way from Bachman Lake down to 175? It won't happen.

feldnick
feldnick

@atosbarn Oh, I remember very well all those picturesque 'artist-renderings'....it was like a brochure for "Runaway Bay". And like good little sugar-coated cereal eaters, we engulfed that lie. And sadly, it was a lie from the beginning. I still don't know why we fell for it.


director21
director21

@Montemalone Now THAT is a project the Dallas City Council might actually approve. Perhaps they could even incorporate a designer fake suspension bridge. The loonier a project is the more likely it will be approved, funded and built.

JimSX
JimSX topcommenter

The flood control system in place in New Orleans in 2005 before Katrina was approved by the Corps of Engineers. The choices and decisions in these matters ultimately are political, not mechanical. The Corps is made up of engineers, not elected leaders.

atosbarn
atosbarn

@feldnick Who is this "we" you speak of?  :-)

director21
director21

@JimSX The Corps is also keenly aware of what caused flooding in New Orleans' Ninth Ward, and that is prcisely why they have been a thorn in the side of Dallas City Council over the Trinity Toll Road Project from the beginning. The Dallas Citizens Council wants that project because they own most of the adjoining land and they want the money they will make off developing it. USACE wants to prevent creation of a new lake called Downtown Dallas Lake.

I do not believe USACE will EVER approve a toll road plan inside the Trinity levees. Even with pilings for an elevated road the amount of displacement would be so great as to require raising the levees 3-4 feet, which USACE has already stated would have to be done.

JimSX
JimSX topcommenter

Couldn't complete comment on phone. Wanted to say that in 2007 the people of Dallas stated with their ballots that flood safety was less important to them than real estate development. If I had to choose a single factor that I think will be govening here in the end, it would be that.

d-may
d-may

@director21 @JimSX The voters were duped by a lot more than that. Like that this project was irreparably tied to the "Dead-man's Curve" fix, and that the Trinity Park wouldn't exist without it. 

Granted, the second one was mostly true, in that the "Trinity Park" was never going to happen anyway regardless of this thing getting built or not. 

director21
director21

@JimSX No, Dallas citizens were duped by the City Attorney's Office writing a ballot initiative where voting "Yes" meant you opposed the toll road and voting "No" meant you favored the toll road.

If the matter were put to a vote today where "yes" means a vote for approving the project and "No" means a vote opposed to the project it would go down in flames by a landlside tally.

JimSX
JimSX topcommenter

Nah. I already got that planned. Life preservers, $4,999.99. Sorry, cash only. Free, if you can prove you voted against the toll road.

baker24
baker24

@JimSX If you are feeling entrepenurial, this could be your chance to lay the ground work for a canoe/kayak rental business for people who want to travel through the Dallas CBD during flood stage.....:-)

 
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