How Dallas Killed Farmers Markets

Dallas leads the nation in over-regulating farmers markets ­— which is why we have so few of them.

In Austin, a Sustainability Food Policy Board, set up by the city and consisting of relevant nonprofit organizations and food and farming businesses, has been instrumental in changing codes to let farmers sample their products and allow food vendors to participate too. They're now looking at a comprehensive farmers market ordinance that fosters the growth of markets instead of stifling them.

Closer to Dallas, Coppell built a small, low-cost pavilion to support a privately managed, city-supported market overseen by a committee of residents, city staff and vendor representatives. There are no restrictions or detailed legislation. The committee is simply trusted to properly manage the market on its own. The experiment was so successful since opening in 2003 that the city plans to capitalize on the momentum by building mixed-use development around it, creating a new and permanent town center. Amanda Vanhoozier, a city employee who oversees the market, says part of their success can be attributed to how they handle farmers. "A lot of people say that we really appreciate the vendors and the farmers," she said. "Our mission is to develop a relationship."

Each of these cities has one thing in common: Governments foster and support private farmers markets, often financially, while maintaining a simple and nonrestrictive focus on public safety.


Sarah Perry courts prospective members at the White Rock Local Market. Dues will help sponsor a nearby community garden.
Mark Graham
Sarah Perry courts prospective members at the White Rock Local Market. Dues will help sponsor a nearby community garden.
Neighborhood markets turn once-vacant parking lots into bustling town squares.
Mark Graham
Neighborhood markets turn once-vacant parking lots into bustling town squares.

The Effects of an Unsupportive City

If Dallas City Hall wanted to stifle neighborhood markets, it did a good job. When the farmers market ordinance won approval in 2010, five neighborhood markets were listed in Jack Ireland's presentation to council's transportation and environment committee. Now there are three.

Meanwhile, neighborhood farmers markets across the rest of the country are shooting up like asparagus stalks in spring. The USDA recorded more than 5,000 markets when Dallas' ordinance took effect. Three years later there are nearly 8,000. The entire nation is participating in a food revolution while Dallas is being left behind.

Dallasites are being robbed of an opportunity to congregate in new, local town centers and connect with local business owners and farmers. They're also missing out on some of the really tasty food that pops up on restaurant menus when farmers and good chefs get together. Katherine Clapner got her start at a neighborhood farmers market selling locally produced confections. Now she's behind Dude, Sweet Chocolate, the best-known chocolate shop in Dallas.

Chad Houser, a Dallas chef who served as a board member for the Dallas Farmers Market Friends, says the lack of access to seasonable produce contributes to keeping Dallas diners in a culinary dark age. The former chef at Parigi, who has since moved on to work with at-risk youths at his Café Momentum project, describes diners at his former restaurant who had no clue what was in season. Customers complained when a popular okra special wasn't available in the fall and demanded tomatoes on their salads in January. Perhaps Dallas diners don't understand farm-to-table because they never got to know the farmers.

This isn't just about hippies buying farm-fresh kale and foodies fetishizing free-range pork raised on acorns and farmer's hugs. The city's chokehold hurts everyone with little access to fresh, healthy food. While the effects of farmers markets pushing into food deserts around the country may be small, a growing number of low-income people receiving Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits — what food stamps are called now — are shopping at farmers markets. Between October 2010 and September 2011 nearly $12 million in SNAP benefits were redeemed at farmers markets, which may not sound like a lot, but it's up nearly $4 million from the previous year. The program is putting fresh produce directly into the hands of the people who need it most while also subsidizing local farms.

Dallas' ordinance pushes farmers into suburban markets while suppressing the potential to create new farmers. Roy and Sofia Martinez worked for the Dallas school district till they both lost their jobs. Now they're growing produce they sell at Perry's White Rock Local Market. Chris Buckalew is a computer science professor who started Weather Top Farms in Forestburg. He sells young greens and vegetables at the Coppell Farmers Market. In Oak Cliff, Steve Smith used his veterans benefits to help start Eat the Yard Organics, a small urban farm. If there were more markets in Dallas creating more consumer demand, there would likely be more of these next-generation farmers.

Joel Salatin is an internationally recognized advocate for local, sustainable farming who may be best known for his appearance on Food Inc., a documentary that in part recounted the plight of the American family farmer. He tries to help more consumers connect with small local farms while teaching farmers how to work sustainably. "Everybody knows farmers have it rough as it is," he said when told about Dallas' ordinance at a recent event in Dallas. "There's a certain volume or scale that's necessary for a viable business." As for Dallas' restrictive regulations, Salatin cited a fundamental right for people to do business with each other. "What would it be like if you went to a shoe store and said you can only sell so many shoes a year?" City Hall's heavy hand isn't just robbing residents of a casual Saturday morning destination. It's stifling the local economy.


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40 comments
sammycharles
sammycharles

Scott,

Thanks for the informative article. I lived in Houston for 10 years and it took forever to get a farmers market there in the 90s. Then I visited a few times and saw a few tiny markets there that were a semblance of a farmers market. Then when I would visit family in Dallas and go to the farmers market I thought , this sucks!!  There are no local farmers this is just a produce vendor market selling marginal produce which 100% isn't organic and no attitude about local items. Truly sad :-(.


Then when I visited a few years ago I went to 2 different markets in Dallas, one on Lovers Lane (really a sad lonely place) one in E Dallas, run by Sarah and thought well at least they have 1 local grower, maybe 2 but the rest was jams and all processed things, a vegan bakery (that was really bad), I appreciated the effort but it didn't really have the farmers market vibe like true ones in California or Seattle or N York or almost every where else that farmers market exist. 

The whole idea is to give farmers a direct outlet to consumers and vice versa.  Dallasites seem to be deprived of this because of the arcane attitude of the city officials and ignorance of their jobs. This city council seems to get mired in regulations and doesn't seem to want to manage the city's affair for the benefit of all it's citizens. But I won't get started on that rant. Why don't they just look at Austin and see how they do their market and copy it. Or Santa Monica or Seattle or ....  Oh wait that might be too cheap and easy. Hopefully this might change in the next decade.

Subnx,

Silly, weirdos, Krogers. Hmm I suspect diversity might be a bit threatening for you. I hope you don't travel much out of Texas, surely not the few hours to Austin or wait even to Deep Ellum in Dallas, Well you ..... I need to stop myself here. I am thankful I won't ever run into you at a farmers market.


And you think the food quality at Krogers is good?? I am falling out of chair laughing or cying. Seriously!!   There is a saying about the food in the US, it looks great on the outside but has no taste on the inside. What do you consider to be quality? One simple tool to measure quality is a refractometer. It gives you the brix level.  If you would test your quality food at Krogers I think you would find it all in the poor category. Or would you be a strong proponent for GMO foods?

Subnx
Subnx

Farmers markets are a silly form of commerce that can't compete with real grocery stores. Only weirdos shop there. The food is of lower quality than you can find at Kroger's where food is quality controlled.

dfmfriends10
dfmfriends10

Hey Scott: Congratulations on a tough story well told. Even I, who have been a DFM supporter for many years and an almost-full time volunteer for 5 yrs. didn't know the background on 'what went wrong'. Thank you for the hard work here. I wish you had written this story 2 yrs ago...When the people of Dallas could have opened their eyes to the city and the city council's mishandling and utter disregard for thier PUBLIC MARKET and its potential and clamored for preserving it.

However, you left out a big piece of the current story for the DFM. While so many have been turning their back on the historic landmark, the DFMFriends went to work and in June, 2012, with the support of the Market staff, completely funded and facilitated the on-site SNAP program. And, they secured a grant from the Texas Dept of Agriculture to further the availability of fresh, nutritious foods to our food insecure neighborhoods. With the Market being so close to the many zip codes in South and East Dallas where grocery stores are few and far between, it's a mystery why SNAP hadn't been utilized much earlier. It's a win-win--for the farmers and for the consumer who previously have not had access to locally grown foods.

Our 'Tasty and Affordable' campaign rolls out next week and is geared to reach those who, with little to no choice, shop at fast-food joints and convenience stores for their dinner. We are reaching out to more and more farmers to keep the DFM as one of the markets where they can bring their produce and  be part of the solution to Dallas' hunger problem. (and yes, there is one). The Friends are big fans of all the farmers markets in our area....just don't throw out this 'big baby' with the bathwater.



bplaney
bplaney

Some great historical reporting... I half expected to hear how the local grocery store operators might have lobbied City Hall to behave this way. Was there no such interference? after all, in terms of grocery chains, Dallas has a lot of competition and I can believe that from their point of view, a vibrant set of Farmers Markets would NOT be welcome.

kpierce1
kpierce1

Scott: A terrific recounting of a chronic problem wholly created by the city. I have covered the Dallas FM  for decades for local publications and written two Dallas Morning News op-ed pieces on the city's lame, ignorant and ham-fisted handling of the market. Your piece is a welcome expose of yet another facet of the problem. 

I don't' know a locavore fan who would not wish the DFM success (or cheer the opening of more Dallas markets). But so many of us have seen so much go wrong at DFM. Coppell brought everyone to the table BEFORE the development around the market went forward (and it was not an easy process). They got down to the micro-issues that make or break a market for vendors (because without the vendors, you have no market). Their farmers market has advocates inside and outside city government. 

The new Dallas group, in contrast, seems to be saying, "Give us a chance. We're going to work this out." I just can't muster a lot of optimism, but yes, I'll wait and see.

As for those tortured regulations that stymie neighborhood market development, here's a simple truth: There is not now nor ever has been, to my knowledge, a farmers market advocate in city government. I keep wondering why Mayor Rawlins, who has been such a strong community advocate, remains silent on the subject.

tcufrog
tcufrog

Yet another example of something that the suburbs and Fort Worth seem to get right but Dallas screws up.  The Cowtown Farmer's Market is popular for locally grown produce (no bananas from Chile there) and supported by the city.  Even though it's small I enjoy going to the Grand Prairie Farmer's Market.  The city does a good job of drawing people to the market by offering programming during each market.  The barriers to operating a booth are low enough that I once spotted an elderly woman who was selling figs she picked from the fig trees in her yard.  They were delicious and you definitely wouldn't have seen that at the Dallas Farmer's Market.

Dallas Farmers Market Stakeholders Association
Dallas Farmers Market Stakeholders Association

Don't give up on the Dallas Farmers Market. There are wonderful changes ahead and the DFM farmer's and local businesses need your support NOW more than ever. The FM neighborhood and community believes in the Farmer's Market potential and wants to see it succeed. Visit the Dallas Farmers Market this weekend.

Texas Local Search
Texas Local Search

There is a Farmers Market every Saturday in Rockwall beginning May 4th through the summer! :)

Dallasphotog
Dallasphotog

You can always count of the City of Dallas to f*ck a good thing up.

Rebecca Finnegan
Rebecca Finnegan

The Dallas Farmers market is/was full of people selling the same produce you get in the store. I went to the Collin County farmers market last Saturday and got yummy produce grown pesticide free by a sweet family from Nevada, honey from Anna, artisan bread baked in Dallas, pastured eggs from a local farm, butter and yogurt from Lucky Layla farms right here in Plano and organic herbs grown by a local woman. Go Plano!

Elizabeth Gutierrez Fong
Elizabeth Gutierrez Fong

i think the idea of a market that the dallas city council has is like central market on lovers ln, lol.

Crystal Means
Crystal Means

I loved the Farmer's Market downtown...I just read an article, I forget where, that said they were revamping it, not closing it for good...the only other one close to me is in Plano but its relatively small and not the best selection. ..so, why is no one trying to fix the issue?

Efriam A. Garza
Efriam A. Garza

People here think Farmers Markets are run by liberals....

Ana Santellana
Ana Santellana

I learned about Farmers Markets while living in Houston a few years ago and absolutely loved it. Had me cooking more & it was pretty cool when the person selling you produce/meat/etc. could tell you about the product in-depth. When I moved back to Dallas I went to the Farmers Market and instantly left. Dirty, smelly, & pretty scary. I definitely wish we had a thriving market...especially since they're trying to revive downtown & get more people outdoors!

Efriam A. Garza
Efriam A. Garza

Anyone remember the way chicken used to taste? Ever notice how different food looks in other countries?

Annette Krausse
Annette Krausse

It's just as difficult to get food truck parks around here!

Efriam A. Garza
Efriam A. Garza

This has to be fixed before we die from eating GMO's....

Dan Berjac
Dan Berjac

I am from Seattle and a recemt transplant to Dallas. It has been sad that it is not easy to find local texas produce. Many urban cities have neighborhood farmers markets. Hopefully we can help Dallas catch up to tasty healthy susutainable living.

edensgardener
edensgardener

Nice recap of the DFM and how it went south. I remember when the WRLM first fired up, before the rules got crazy. They ran on opposite weekends of our (now) 6 year old running neighborhood all ranchers and farmer's clean foods market in Balch Springs (Eden's)  - less than 15 mins away from downtown Dallas/Lakewood. We also share(d) farmers and ranchers who were tired of the politics and mis-informed customers at the downtown market - which was no longer representative of a real farmers market experience; although, many customers didn't know any different. I remember scouring reviews of the downtown market hearing rave reviews of the wide selection from "farmers". DFM has done a lot to try to make things right for farmers/ranchers who've been nudged out, but I still hear a lot of negative feedback from them. It will be interesting to hear how the new group handles things downtown. A mostly hands- off approach (once reasonable safety issues are addressed). Do legislators think farmers are dumb or irresponsible or what? Maybe they just think we're rich and can afford thousands in annual fees..... The new market up on Plano had to jump through ridiculous hoops to get opened, too.  It's silly when you think back not too long ago when people traded food openly - and few ever got sick like we have with mega food distribution systems.

I do thoroughly screen our farmers for growing techniques, etc., but don't require them to jump through tons of paperwork or hoops to set up here - once we have determined they qualify to sell to our customers. (We have many folks who rely on knowing that all of our vendors are "clean" growers for medical reasons, as well as ethical ones.) We have always had a very friendly and laid back market on a small farm where folks get to know who grows/raises the food and you'll not find pineapples - but you'd be surprised how many sometimes call and ask....  we do our best to educate customers as well as take care of their local market needs. We encourage relationships between our chefs, farmers and the buying public.

Educating consumers, as Houser/Provost, Dodds, Harris, McCallister, Salum, Hobbs, Luscher, Quinones, Tesar, Natera and so many other local chefs try to do with their changing seasonal menus, is key to helping local small farmers survive - and in turn the small markets that give them an outlet - and, then in turn, the local economies that get a boost. If more regular cooking folks would also tailor their home menus around what is available from their local markets first, then fill in with their "gotta have" items, everyone wins.

It is difficult to find enough help to cover all of the popping up markets as they mostly fall at the same day/time. But by supporting local growers directly through markets, CSA subscriptions and patronizing your local farm to table chefs, you're supporting and helping a small farmer/producer capture 100% of their efforts by being able to sell their products at retail. We thank you all for your support of local ag!


rincru
rincru

Sarah Perry has done more for generating a micro-economy for East Dallas than any other person I can think of.  By starting White Rock Local Market, she has allowed many small businesses to grow and thrive.  Small Market Vendors also generate City and County Sales Tax (as well as State Sales  and Federal income tax), we start small in our homes and move to paying rent in commercial space, we pay living wages to employees, and buy supplies and services from other local businesses.  We are true economic catalysts for the City, and when the market rules were being made and we asked to be heard by City Staff we were treated like lepers.  Many small market vendors are transitioning from layoffs, disabling illness, or stints as stay at home Moms.  The last few years there were few jobs and there certainly was no credit to be had from financial institutions.  Having your own small business, which is local, organic and self-started takes a lot of nerve and determined work...I certainly didn't appreciate a response I had talking to a certain City staff member which equated to, "let them eat cake".

ebailey75057
ebailey75057

Dallas's lose is the suburb's gain.

A major city without a respectable farmer's market? 

Your crooked council's ineptness in action.

We use a local co-op to purchase local farmer's produce. Good Eats! 

sherilenoir
sherilenoir

Dallas city government taking something simple and happy, overbloating it with unnecessary regulations and shady sales practices to make a quick buck? say it ain't so. *falling over from non surprise*

Blake Wilson
Blake Wilson

It should read "How Dallas City Hall Killed Farmers Markets". Another government is the problem scenario.

scott.reitz
scott.reitz moderator

@sammycharles If you haven't checked out Sarah Perry's market as of late you should. I was just there today, and it seems to constantly grow.

kpierce1
kpierce1

@bplaney I don't think so. In my 30+ years of reporting about farmers markets, that has never come up in connection with Dallas. It has been a factor in a few outlying suburbs.

ghkyluhhje
ghkyluhhje

@tcufrog Bahaha! That was funny. I've never heard of that place-which probably means it's not significant.

Vndallas
Vndallas

@tcufrog 

Oh sweetie, but the Cowtown Farmers Market is in Fort Worth....so nobody cares.

MikeDunlap
MikeDunlap

@Dallas Farmers Market Stakeholders Association 

The market has long been a car exhaust infested dump that the Stakeholders Association has done nothing to change, god forbid parking space be reduced in their sheds.

scott.reitz
scott.reitz moderator

@Texas Local Search The more the better.

DFMBusinessOwner
DFMBusinessOwner

Crystal, The Dallas Farmers Market is NOT closing.  The Dallas Farmers Market is being Privatized.  It will be fixed up, improved and made better. The City of Dallas will no longer manage the farmers market which will remove a lot of the rules, ordinances and regulations that have made it so difficult for the farmer's. 

MikeDunlap
MikeDunlap

@ebailey75057 

Crooked council aside, I highly doubt anyone in Dallas wishes he lived in Lewisville.

ghkyluhhje
ghkyluhhje

@MikeDunlap "god forbid parking space be reduced in their sheds"-yeah, because it's not like anyone in Dallas drives cars. They all drive camels. Or donkeys. You probably drive an ass.

DFMBusinessOwner
DFMBusinessOwner

Mike, you need to familiarize yourself with the changes underway at the Dallas Farmers Market. The parking you mention in the shed's is all going away.  Both Shed 1 and Shed 2 will be expanded, re-finished and open for pedestrian traffic only.  Focusing back on local farmers and local businesses - rid of the city regulations that have made it so difficult. As for the Farmers Market Stakeholder's, without their neighborhood advocacy and community involvement the Dallas Farmers Market would have been closed and area further crippled. Would you rather have this section of  Downtown completely boarded up, vacant and overrun with the homeless?  Is that your idea of a solution? 

ebailey75057
ebailey75057

Mr. Dunlap,

So sorry you feel that one of our beloved metroplex burbs is beneath your current social status.  I'm sure the city of Lewisville and its residents  appreciate and respect your opinion.  However,  would you please remind us what your point was regarding the topic and subject matter contained in the article instead of commenting on where people might or might not reside in the metroplex and your apparently inherit prejudices against where they have decided to domicile?     

Lewisville1is1trash
Lewisville1is1trash

@ebailey75057 I'll be happy to respond a, even if it is a few months late.  Lewisville is the anus of the Metroplex; the "local co-op," there is pathetic, and full of the same vegetables from the same wholesalers that plague the DFM. Don't post a comment comparing your glorious city's co-op to that of Dallas' market, and not expect some backlash. Lewisville has what is, probably, the worst source of fresh fruits and veggies in DFW.  Hell, the market at White Rock annihilates your precious co-op, at it serves a NEIGHBORHOOD. Anyways, enjoy your run-down, deserted strip malls and the death-rattle of a pseudo-wealthy suburb that almost was... in the 90's.

 
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