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Irving Needs More of Dallas's Water. And So Does the North Texas Municipal Water District.

What remains of Lake Lavon
What remains of Lake Lavon
Flickr: RandomSandy

Speaking of Dallas's water supply ...

I was on US 380 yesterday, headed to Cattleman's Cafe in Blue Ridge for chicken-fried steak, when, driving toward Farmersville, I espied what's left of Lake Lavon, down some 13 feet due to the drought. "It's stunning," in the words of North Texas Municipal Water District spokesperson Denise Hickey. That's one way of putting it.

I called Hickey because I see here that the NTMWD is looking to buy water from Dallas, in large part because Lavon's 47.59 percent full at last look one week ago. That, combined with the fact Zebra mussels have taken over Lake Texoma, is devastating the Collin County water district, which gets 28 percent of its supply from Texoma.

"Purchasing some raw water supply [from Dallas] would help fill in that gap," says Hickey, who notes that the NTMWD currently doesn't buy any water from Dallas. "We have the infrastructure in place where we can move additional supplies from Lake Tawakoni. I am not sure how much Dallas is willing to sell."

As you can see from the city's own look at its water reservoirs' supply. Tawakoni's down more than seven feet. And perhaps you noticed: In the memo Assistant City Manager Forest Turner sent to council at the end of last week, Irving's also looking to buy more water from Dallas, since Lake Jim Chapman, which is maintained by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, is emptying at a dizzying pace: It's down close to 80 percent depleted, and provides water to Irving, the NTMWD, Sulphur Springs and three other smaller cities.

I've left messages for Jody Puckett, director of Dallas Water Utilities. But Hickey says the proposal to sell Dallas's water to the NTMWD is expected to go to the Dallas City Council in February.


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