Inside the Morgue at Golden Gate Funeral Home

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Kimberly Thorpe

The classic Y incision is evidence of an autopsy, conducted at the county medical examiners office. The mask worn by the embalmer prevents the hazardous inhalation of formaldehyde.

Few see inside a morgue. That's the way it should be, right? Not according to John Beckwith Jr., CEO of Golden Gate Funeral Home, and the subject of this week's cover story. Feel free to take a peek inside. You're invited.

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4 comments
jordanjohnsonboo
jordanjohnsonboo

I guess I had never really thought about this part of the process. Is there a lot of training that people have to go through in order to do this sort of job? It seems like there is a lot of things that a potential employee would need to learn, but I don't think I have ever heard anything about any training programs.  http://www.thomasfuneralchapels.com

quintrent13
quintrent13

Not very many people can work in funeral homes. This is not just because they have to work with bodies like they do, but because of the chemicals too. There is a lot always going on and it is not the easiest thing to deal with. That is why only a certain few can have these kinds of jobs.
 http://www.kainmurphy.com

marcusfillion
marcusfillion

Wow, I thought I could make it through this album, but I'm more squeamish than I realized. I don't think I could work in a funeral home, but I certainly appreciate the service they provide. I don't know what this country would do without well-run funeral homes. It's a very specific industry, but everyone has to use it at some point. http://www.prittsfuneralhome.com/services/funeral-services

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