Protest in Denton Aims to Pull Old Dixie Monument Down

Protest in Denton Aims to Pull Old Dixie Monument Down

A small group of protesters gathered at Denton County's Confederate memorial on Super Bowl Sunday to demand its removal. Protesters were outnumbered by media and a heavy law enforcement presence, including sharpshooters positioned atop buildings. The demonstrators had come together to protest the decision by Denton County's citizen’s monument committee to keep the old Confederate soldier statue but with an additional plaque and informational slavery videos. The Denton Record-Chronicle reported shortly after the announcement Thursday that county commissioners were skeptical of the idea. “I think having electronics out in the weather may have operational problems,” Commissioner Hugh Coleman told the paper. “If we do this, we want to do it right. I don’t want it constantly breaking down.” Nearly everyone around these parts knows the old Confederate soldier statue isn’t going anywhere. It’s been part of Denton County history and culture for as long as anyone can remember. County Judge Mary Horn hasn’t kept her opposition to its removal a secret, either. It takes three yes votes from county commissioners to remove it, but even the protesters agree that as long as Horn is in charge, removing it is like trying to get ice in hell.


A small group of protesters gathered at Denton County's Confederate memorial on Super Bowl Sunday to demand its removal. Protesters were outnumbered by media and a heavy law enforcement presence, including sharpshooters positioned atop buildings. The demonstrators had come together to protest the decision by Denton County's citizen’s monument committee to keep the old Confederate soldier statue but with an additional plaque and informational slavery videos. The Denton Record-Chronicle reported shortly after the announcement Thursday that county commissioners were skeptical of the idea. “I think having electronics out in the weather may have operational problems,” Commissioner Hugh Coleman told the paper. “If we do this, we want to do it right. I don’t want it constantly breaking down.” Nearly everyone around these parts knows the old Confederate soldier statue isn’t going anywhere. It’s been part of Denton County history and culture for as long as anyone can remember. County Judge Mary Horn hasn’t kept her opposition to its removal a secret, either. It takes three yes votes from county commissioners to remove it, but even the protesters agree that as long as Horn is in charge, removing it is like trying to get ice in hell.
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