Concert Reviews

Perfect Pussy Stopped Show Early, Railed Against Sexism at Three Links

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It was a remarkable speech and certainly an unexpected way to end a show that had only lasted for 20 minutes. Needless to say, the crowd was more than a little surprised by the sudden turn of events, not least because the flyer in question -- which depicted two topless women in bondage, strung up by their wrists -- had been removed from the venue prior to the show, reportedly at Graves' insistence.

To call the episode a rant, however, would be unfair, and also miss the point of her anger. "I feel things in here," Graves said, pointing at her heart. "As women, we're taken less seriously at the work we do because we work hard. When you see tits on a flyer you feel lonely, weird and isolated."

From there, she made the disquieting connection with the horrific murders that happened recently in Isla Vista, California, saying that "men feel so entitled to women's bodies" that they'll "kill them" in order to feel like they're in control.

If ever such words felt like they had real conviction, this was the time. For those brief 20 minutes that the band had been playing, Graves' performance was one continuous burst of rage, though in this instance rendered close to futile: As a matter of course, she wrings her entire body for every ounce of effort she can muster, but her vocals were almost completely drowned out in the mix last night. Only her highest-pitched screams made an audible sound over the thrashing of her band mates.

In many ways, that's the point: Perfect Pussy's live show is such a mess of noise, so hellbent on assaulting the audience, that picking out songs is next to impossible. It's also perhaps the band's major shortcoming, because musically speaking the loudest, craziest components aren't terribly interesting. It seeks to destroy, but doesn't. The only truly menacing part of it is the bleating, droning keys of Shaun Sutkus.

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Jeff Gage
Contact: Jeff Gage