Says Circulation, this map shows "hospitals, firehouses, and patients with suspected cardiac symptoms who called 911 in 2004. Hospitals are represented by an H. Firehouses with EMS facilities are represented by a red cross. Patient calls ... are represented by shaded circles and are scaled in size to represent the number of calls."
Says Circulation, this map shows "hospitals, firehouses, and patients with suspected cardiac symptoms who called 911 in 2004. Hospitals are represented by an H. Firehouses with EMS facilities are represented by a red cross. Patient calls ... are represented by shaded circles and are scaled in size to represent the number of calls."

Ladies First? Not Always, At Least When It Comes to Cardiac Emergency Treatment.

You pick -- the long version or the short. The long version is an eight-page article from the most recent issue of Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes titled "Elapsed Time in Emergency Medical Services for Patients With Cardiac Complaints: Are Some Patients at Greater Risk for Delay?" Tufts researchers looked exclusively at Dallas County in 2004 -- some 5,887 patients "with suspected cardiac-related symptoms" in all.

And they concluded: Yes, some patients are at greater risk for delay. Who? Women. Why? Says The New York Times' summary this morning: "Other studies have suggested that heart problems in women are not recognized as readily by medical personnel."

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