100 Favorite Dishes

100 Favorite Dishes, No. 41: The Fish Sauce Caramel Brussels Sprouts at Junction

These are not your average Brussels sprouts.
These are not your average Brussels sprouts. Beth Rankin
click to enlarge These are not your average Brussels sprouts. - BETH RANKIN
These are not your average Brussels sprouts.
Beth Rankin
Leading up to September's Best of Dallas® 2017 issue, we're sharing (in no particular order) our 100 Favorite Dishes, the Dallas entrées, appetizers and desserts that really stuck with us this year.

The bowl arrives at the table, its garnish dancing happily atop a small mountain of vegetables. The Brussels sprouts at Junction are not your average vegetable side dish: These Brussels sprouts are cooked in a sticky, sweet caramel made from fish sauce. The bonito flakes, made of preserved fish, dance on top of the dish when the flakes react to the heat emanating from below. They add a subtly sweet, fishy umami that plays off that caramelized exterior of the crispy Brussels sprouts, and the resulting dish is somewhere between candy and produce.

The burnt-lime mayo atop the dish gives it all a warm creaminess, and when it all comes together, it becomes immediately apparent why our server so fervently suggested this dish. It's magic, and not just because of the dancing bonito flakes on top.
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Beth Rankin is an Ohio native and Cicerone-certified beer server who specializes in social media, food and drink, travel and news reporting. Her belief system revolves around the significance of Topo Chico, the refusal to eat crawfish out of season and the importance of local and regional foodways.
Contact: Beth Rankin