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East Hampton Sandwich Company in Snider Plaza is Now Open, As Are the Lobster Crates

See Also: The Lobster Roll Smack Down

The East Hampton Sandwich Company opened Wednesday in Snider Plaza (Lovers and Hillcrest). Owner Hunter Pond recently ditched law school to test his hand in the local restaurant business (he makes no bones about it - he emphatically hated law school).

When Pond initially came up with the idea of opening a restaurant, he knew he wanted to serve high-end sandwiches, including lobster rolls like the ones found in the northeast. And he wanted the vibe to be like that of a seaside sandwich shop in East Hampton, New York, which is a community I've never visited, but probably serves as a good point of reference for most of the clientele at Snider Plaza.

It seems he's got the first part nailed down. All the proteins (aside from the lobster, which we'll get to quickly) at East Hampton are brined for 24-hours and carved just prior to serving. Local bakery Empire Baking Company provides all the bread, including some custom rolls, and all of the sauces, sides and desserts are made on-site daily.

Sandwiches include a Cuban, turkey bacon and avocado (photo below), fried chicken and jack (photo below), hot cheese short rib and a lobster roll. For vegetarians, there's an asparagus and Gruyere, and a goat cheese and avocado with a red pepper aioli. There are also two salads, plus a roasted corn chowder soup. "Hampton style slaw," house-made potato chips and grilled asparagus are all side options.

The lobster roll is going to be all the talk at Snider Plaza, though. In addition to the traditional knuckle and claw meat, Pond has doubled down with a split lobster tail on the sandwich as well. It's an inspiring amount of tender white meat.

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I watched them make it in their open kitchen and prior to stuffing the roll with lobster, it's brushed with a generous amount of butter as it toasts on the grill. Then a garlic dressing lightly touches the micro greens at the bottom of the sandwich. And, surprisingly, it's only $16.

A small bar shoots off from the kitchen, in addition to a modest size dining room that has a coastal vibe. There are six beers on draft, including Coors, Miller, Stella and White Rascal. Plus, cans (only) of Woodchuck, Brooklyn East IPA, Harpoon UFO White and a few others.

White and red wine by the glass or bottle start at $7 and $24, respectively.

Restaurant design firm Plan B Group renovated the space and the concept concept is classy and subtle. But, is it really like East Hampton? Doesn't matter. Just go get that lobster roll.

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