Eat This

Eat This: The Pörkölt at Armoury D.E.

When Armoury D.E. first opened earlier this year, the few Hungarian dishes added to the menu felt like an experiment. Owner Peter Novotny noticed that Hungarian restaurants were popular in Chicago and other towns to the north but nonexistent in Dallas. He thought there was no reason similar plates shouldn't be well received here, but he stopped short of opening a full-fledged Hungarian restaurant. So there were gulyas, chicken paprikash and others on the menu, but they shared space with more common plates like grilled chicken sandwiches and grilled mahi mahi.

That first menu was released early this fall, and Novotny says his customers are devouring the Hungarian plates. The dishes are doing so well he decided to add more hearty dishes when he released a new menu last week.

Check out the pörkölt pictured above. It features cubed rib-eye cooked tender in a hearty stew. Don't confuse this with the gulyas that was already on the menu (and remains). This is less soupy, more meaty and packs a spicy punch. The meat is fatty, but in a good way, and that spaetzle is finished in a sauté pan with butter to give it a nice crust. 

There's another new dish called lésco. This peppery stew made with onions and paprika is packed with gyulai, a Hungarian sausage, and bologna.

If you're worried about the coming cold winter nights and want to pack on a little more insulation, Novotny has put together a compelling offering. I asked him how he was going to handle his menu in the coming summer heat, but he told me he'd figure that one out later. For now, he's just happy Dallasites have taken a shine to his bar food.


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Scott Reitz
Contact: Scott Reitz