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Pressed Juicery Showcases Black Artists for Black History Month

Alannah Tiller of Austin was one of the artists selected by Pressed Juicery to celebrate Black History Month by creating special bottle labels.EXPAND
Alannah Tiller of Austin was one of the artists selected by Pressed Juicery to celebrate Black History Month by creating special bottle labels.
courtesy of Pressed Juicery
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We can’t say enough good things about fresh juices these days, and Dallas offers a wide array of places to get them.

This month, if you pick up your favorite juice at Pressed Juicery, the beautiful label may catch your eye. To celebrate Black History Month, the company is sharing the work of three Black artists on bottles of their most popular juices.

Each artist has been recognized for promoting solidarity, strength and diversity in her art and in her community. A portion of the proceeds from the sale of these three juices will go back to the artists.

“By celebrating Black History Month, Pressed aims to honor the achievements of all Black Americans and commemorate them through the work of these inspiring artists,” Pressed Juicery CMO Michelle Peterson says in a press release. “We invite our customers to join us in celebrating Black history and honoring the Black voices that continue to shape our future.”

Alannah Tiller of Austin designed the label for the Citrus 2 juice. The line work in the design signifies family, while the shapes layered on top represent diversity. Visit her Instagram page @alilscribble to see or purchase more of her abstract art that celebrates everyday objects and people.

The Orange Turmeric juice bottle label was designed by Mikenzi Jones, who calls herself a “hippie at heart.” Hert artwork, "Melanin Rainbow," was inspired by women of color and women’s empowerment.

"Melanin Rainbow," artist Mikenzie Jones' work celebrates women of color and women's empowerment.EXPAND
"Melanin Rainbow," artist Mikenzie Jones' work celebrates women of color and women's empowerment.
courtesy of Mikenzie Jones

“Growing up without representation of women who looked like me, it was important for me to create a piece that helped black women feel included, beautiful and confident just the way they are,” Jones says. You can see more of her work on her Instagram @mikenzijones.

The third label displays a work called “Scorpion” from the Roots 3 bottle. Brooklyn-based technical designer Perryn Ford created the work as part of a series entitled “Life in Flow Motion” which was inspired by her love and appreciation for yoga. Visit her Instagram @perrynryan to see more of her work.

The limited-edition bottles will be available through the month of February for in-store, online and Pressed Juicery app purchases.

Pressed Juicery, 2222 McKinney Ave. No. 230 (Uptown). Additional locations in Heirloom Haul at Fleastyle in Frisco, Southlake Marketplace and West Bend, Fort Worth.

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