Lists

Nine Dallas Restaurants That Only Serve One Dish – and Totally Nail It

Ten Ramen is one of a small number of Dallas restaurants that focus solely on one dish, and their expertise shows in the finished product.
Ten Ramen is one of a small number of Dallas restaurants that focus solely on one dish, and their expertise shows in the finished product. Kathy Tran

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If you're looking for a light, healthy, gluten-free bite in the Arts District, DMA's Socca is a good place to start. - BRIAN REINHART
If you're looking for a light, healthy, gluten-free bite in the Arts District, DMA's Socca is a good place to start.
Brian Reinhart
Socca
1717 N. Harwood St.
Last summer, the Dallas Museum of Art opened an outdoor pavilion with a crepe cafe specializing in a chickpea-based savory pancake popular in the far south of France. The naturally gluten-free crepe is then topped with offerings like roasted grapes, fresh herbs and house-ground almond butter. You can also order an assortment of meats and local cheeses to snack on with a fresh socca (pronounced SOAK-uh) while you sip wine or local beer.

Empa Mundo serves nothing but empanadas, and they're tiny little pockets of magic. - LANCE HIGDON
Empa Mundo serves nothing but empanadas, and they're tiny little pockets of magic.
Lance Higdon

Empa Mundo
3977 N. Belt Line Road, Irving
If you're in Irving and in a hurry, you can't go wrong at Empa Mundo, a restaurant devoted to Argentine crepes with a Texas influence. When entering, saunter up to the register and mark your order with a grease pencil on a laminated menu and you'll receive a basket of hot empanadas filled with brisket or chorizo or sweet potato. If you opt for a savory crepe (there are ample sweet options, too), don't leave without some of Empa Mundo's killer chimichurri sauce.

Pok's poke bowls are above-average in a city currently inundated with poke restaurants. - BETH RANKIN
Pok's poke bowls are above-average in a city currently inundated with poke restaurants.
Beth Rankin
Pok the Raw Bar
3699 McKinney Ave.
Nestled in the hustle and bustle of West Village, Pok the Raw Bar looks unforgivably trendy. But once you try this poke, a traditionally Hawaiian dish made with raw fish and fresh vegetables, you won't even notice all the SoulCyclers wandering by on their way to Kendra Scott. With an eye on sustainable and sometimes local sourcing, the menu is based on poke bowls made with wild-caught Japanese albacore, responsibly farmed Scottish salmon and wild-caught yellowfin tuna. Go with a signature bowl or build your own with components like cauliflower rice, spicy ponzu, shiso and togaroshi. Technically, Pok does specialize in a second item: matcha. Using ceremonial-grade Japanese matcha, Pok serves up beautiful bright green pick-me-ups made with options that include cacao mint almond milk and yuzu lemonade.

click to enlarge If you've got $4, you've got one hell of a lunch at Quoc Bao Bakery. - COURTESY OF THU HIEN
If you've got $4, you've got one hell of a lunch at Quoc Bao Bakery.
Courtesy of Thu Hien
Quoc Bao Bakery
3419 W Walnut St., Garland
This is one of the greatest banh mis in North Texas, and that's all you'll find on this menu, unless you're in the mood for baked goods, as Quoc Bao bakes their own bread and a few other offerings. Not only are these banh mi fresh, authentic and outrageously flavorful, they're all under $4, which makes this one of the cheapest lunches in DFW.
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Beth Rankin is an Ohio native and Cicerone-certified beer server who specializes in social media, food and drink, travel and news reporting. Her belief system revolves around the significance of Topo Chico, the refusal to eat crawfish out of season and the importance of local and regional foodways.
Contact: Beth Rankin