Weather

With Ice in the Forecast It's Time to Stock Up; Pete Delkus and Twitter Have Some Suggestions

Case of Truly? Check.
Case of Truly? Check. Dori Berg
Another winter storm will soon descend on Texas, which has a few people a bit nervous especially considering it's Groundhog Day, because that's just creepy. Things shouldn't be as bad as last February's storm, but we should still probably stock up on a bunch of stuff we don't really need. Following is a grocery list we’ve prepared for those who can’t afford a ticket to Cancun.
Pete Delkus' Chili
Last fall, the iceman himself over at WFAA shared his recipe for chili on Facebook, aptly called Pete's Smoked Brisket, Bison and Bacon Chili. There are no beans, naturally. You'll need a 5-pound brisket, 2 pounds of ground bison meat and 1 pound of bacon.

Wine, Whisky and Beer
Plan for your booze stockpile (and toilet paper) with this scenario in mind: It may ice just once, but how long until it fully clears up and you're comfortable driving in Dallas again? Go big just in case. Here are some boxed wine suggestions from our wine curmudgeon Jeff Siegel. For this particular weather event, he says he'll have a 1-liter bottle of the Faisao vinho verde rose, "so it will be cold and ready to drink even if the power goes out."
Bread and Butter
So, your sourdough starter died? That's fine, it was time to turn that page anyway. Go to a local baker and buy a couple of loaves along with some fancy butter. It's essential civilization-type stuff. We'll always be OK so long as we have good bread and butter. But, here's the real question, how do you butter your bread? Fights start over this question. Do you keep your butter in the fridge or are you a counter butter person? Do you have cats? Do you butter your bread before toasting it? See? Fights.

Peanut Butter and Jelly
Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches are one of the best foods to come out of human civilization aside from pizza. Peanut butter, in particular, is good with almost everything. PB&Js are also cheap, easy to make, and no cold storage is necessary for any of the ingredients. Boxed Mac and Cheese
In the positive scenario of the power grid still working during the storm, boxed mac and cheese is a simple go-to meal. The same goes for other simple dishes like ramen, eggs (fried, scramble or sunny-side up) or rice and beans. These are foods you likely already have in your pantry, and even if the electricity goes out, you can still cook if you have a grill or gas stove.

Canned Goods
Canned meats such as tuna, salmon or chicken provide protein and will last for two to three years in your pantry. Vacuum-sealed pouches are another good choice, but they have a shorter shelf life. Canned beans provide an excellent source of protein, fiber, and are versatile in the kitchen.

Fruits & Dried Fruits
Apples and oranges are packed with Vitamin C and fiber. They’re also one of the most shelf-stable produces in case we lose power. Dried fruits can serve as an excellent alternative, but if excess sugar is of concern, check labels for no added sugar.

Comfort Foods
Comfort foods can quite literally be anything. There's plenty of comfort to be found in chocolate, Pop Tarts and Carlo Rossi Sangria. In terms of New Year's resolutions or whatever, everyone gets a free pass for the next few days as we have to endure the stress of potentially dealing with being iced in without power. Again.
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Chance Townsend is the Dallas Observer's food intern for spring 2022. He's a grad student at UNT, and his favorite time of the day is unlimited mimosa brunch. If he's not writing about food then he's probably in the kitchen cooking it.