^
Keep Dallas Observer Free
4

Cowboys, Ezekiel Elliott Sued Over 2017 Traffic Accident

A Frisco man is suing the Dallas Cowboys and their star running back, Ezekiel Elliott, for $20 million.
A Frisco man is suing the Dallas Cowboys and their star running back, Ezekiel Elliott, for $20 million.
Scott Stuart/ZUMA Press/Newscom

The 2019 offseason continues to be about anything but football for the Dallas Cowboys and their star running back, Ezekiel Elliott. Tuesday afternoon, Ronnie Hill sued Elliott and the team for interfering with police during the aftermath of a 2017 crash near the Cowboys headquarters at The Star in Frisco.

Hill, who is seeking $20 million, claims that the "Dallas Cowboys conspired with the Frisco Police Department to cover up the severity of the accident to assure that Elliott’s health would not be placed in question before their (January 2017) playoff game" against the Green Bay Packers.

The Cowboys declined the Observer's request for comment, but Frisco denied any conspiracy allegations on behalf of its police department.

“The petition alleges on ‘information and belief’ that the Frisco Police Department ‘conspired’ with the Dallas Cowboys to ‘cover up the severity of the crash.’ This allegation is false,” the city said.

On Jan. 11, 2017, a GMC Yukon driven by Elliott crashed into Hill's BMW 750, causing the two vehicles to be wedged together and both of the Yukon's airbags to deploy, according to the lawsuit. Immediately after the wreck, Elliott admitted the accident was his fault, Hill says in his suit.

“At the scene of the crash, Elliott admitted fault, and the Frisco Police also concluded that the crash was Elliott’s fault. Elliott and running back’s coach Gary Brown who was on the scene told Hill not to worry about anything, go get checked out and ‘we will take care of everything,’" the suit says. "If anyone had actually reported the impact of the accident and had Elliott been examined he would have most likely been placed in concussion protocol and out for the Dallas Cowboys upcoming playoff game. Upon information and belief, the Dallas Cowboys conspired with the Frisco Police Department to cover up the severity of the accident to assure that Elliott’s health would not be placed in question before their playoff game."

I Support
  • Local
  • Community
  • Journalism
  • logo

Support the independent voice of Dallas and help keep the future of Dallas Observer free.

Elliott played well in the Cowboys' playoff game four days later against the Packers, running for 125 yards on 22 carries, but the Cowboys lost, 34-31.

The crash caused more than $33,000 worth of damage to Hill's BMW, according to the suit. In addition to the damage to his car, Hill claims he has suffered unspecified physical injuries, mental anguish and the loss of earning capacity. 

Keep the Dallas Observer Free... Since we started the Dallas Observer, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of Dallas, and we would like to keep it that way. Offering our readers free access to incisive coverage of local news, food and culture. Producing stories on everything from political scandals to the hottest new bands, with gutsy reporting, stylish writing, and staffers who've won everything from the Society of Professional Journalists' Sigma Delta Chi feature-writing award to the Casey Medal for Meritorious Journalism. But with local journalism's existence under siege and advertising revenue setbacks having a larger impact, it is important now more than ever for us to rally support behind funding our local journalism. You can help by participating in our "I Support" membership program, allowing us to keep covering Dallas with no paywalls.

We use cookies to collect and analyze information on site performance and usage, and to enhance and customize content and advertisements. By clicking 'X' or continuing to use the site, you agree to allow cookies to be placed. To find out more, visit our cookies policy and our privacy policy.

 

Join the Observer community and help support independent local journalism in Dallas.

 

Join the Observer community and help support independent local journalism in Dallas.