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Dallas Rape Crisis Center Would Prefer That Judge Not Send Rapist to Volunteer There

Sir Young may have hated to say that he was a rapist, but he couldn't deny it, either. "That's rape," he said in a recorded interview with a Dallas police detective, describing his encounter with a 14-year-old girl. Young was 18 at the time. They were both students at Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts. "I hate to have that on my plate. But that's rape."

Now 20, Young pleaded guilty to sexual assault of a child. He could have spent up to twenty years in prison. But instead, Dallas County District Judge Jeanine Howard decided to give him a nice break during his sentencing last week.

Young will spend a short stint of just 45 days in jail, Judge Howard ruled. And when he's out, the sentence says, "the defendant is to start 250 hours of Community Service at the Rape Crisis Center."

Oh no he won't, says the rape crisis center. Apparently, rape victims don't like turning to rapists in times of crisis.

"We all read it [the sentence] and we're like, wait a minute," Bobbie Villareal, Executive Director of the Dallas Area Rape Crisis Center, tells Unfair Park.

The center accepts volunteers, but not people completing community service hours. Volunteers all have to undergo a criminal background check. "You cannot in any form or fashion have anything on your record," Villareal says. "The fact that she would order 250 hours at a rape crisis center just surprised us."

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Curious, Villareal has been waiting to see if Young ever calls the center about completing his community service there. (If the call comes in, the answer is still no).

The only other rape crisis center in Dallas is at Parkland. And they don't use any volunteers at all, a hospital spokesman tells Unfair Park.

It seems then that Young has little chance of spending 250 hours assisting rape victims. Informed of this, the judge's court coordinator told Unfair Park that she'll change the sentence slightly. "She's going go back and modify those conditions and give him community service hours somewhere else, but she hasn't determined where yet," Court Coordinator Jerry Barker says. The judge's office otherwise declined to comment on the sentence.

Hopefully, the new volunteer spot will not be a place involves direct contact with sexual assault victims or children.

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