4

Sure, the West Fork of the Trinity Looks Beautiful From the Freeway. But Up Close ...?

^
Keep Dallas Observer Free
I Support
  • Local
  • Community
  • Journalism
  • logo

Support the independent voice of Dallas and help keep the future of Dallas Observer free.

On the way out to the ballpark a couple of weeks ago, as we drove down 30 over Belt Line, the boy noticed for the first time how close the Trinity River runs next the freeway. I told him that's known as the West Fork of the Trinity, which merges with the Elm Fork when it hits Dallas. He suggested we hop out and talk a hike; instead we took in a ballgame.

But, so happens, I know a few guys who did scope out the area, among them photographer Steven Wallace, who posted this photo to his Facebook page yesterday. It was taken Tuesday at that very spot: I-30 and Belt Line, which looks lovely when you're zooming by at 65 miles per hour.

"When you're driving by you don't actually see it," Wallace says this morning. "But it's disgusting. I've never seen anything like it. I saw a turtle swimming in it, and I was like, 'Oh, really?'"

Wallace says he was down there shooting a film for a big project we can't say much more about till later this summer. But he was accompanied by two other familiar faces: photographers Hal Samples and Dylan Hollingsworth -- who, last September, took those photos of that "wasteland" of trash along White Rock Creek that prompted an impromptu clean-up effort. Dylan's photos will be part of the same multimedia project.

That's Dylan and Hal at right; at left is environmentalist Tammy Chan, who runs Keep Grand Prairie Beautiful. As opposed to this.

Keep the Dallas Observer Free... Since we started the Dallas Observer, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of Dallas, and we would like to keep it that way. Offering our readers free access to incisive coverage of local news, food and culture. Producing stories on everything from political scandals to the hottest new bands, with gutsy reporting, stylish writing, and staffers who've won everything from the Society of Professional Journalists' Sigma Delta Chi feature-writing award to the Casey Medal for Meritorious Journalism. But with local journalism's existence under siege and advertising revenue setbacks having a larger impact, it is important now more than ever for us to rally support behind funding our local journalism. You can help by participating in our "I Support" membership program, allowing us to keep covering Dallas with no paywalls.

We use cookies to collect and analyze information on site performance and usage, and to enhance and customize content and advertisements. By clicking 'X' or continuing to use the site, you agree to allow cookies to be placed. To find out more, visit our cookies policy and our privacy policy.

 

Join the Observer community and help support independent local journalism in Dallas.

 

Join the Observer community and help support independent local journalism in Dallas.