Food News

Meat Point Is a Kosher Steakhouse and More in North Dallas

Lamb shawarma on a baguette
Lamb shawarma on a baguette Hank Vaughn
Yehuda Alali has been the owner and chef of Meat Point, a kosher restaurant in North Dallas with a Beit Yosef certificate to prove it, since 2014. The Israeli chef brought more than 15 years of experience to Meat Point, offering what he describes as Israeli-American fusion.

Menu items include steaks, high-end burgers, lamb chops, chicken and kabobs, along with several different hummus plates, salads, falafel, pargiot (chicken thighs) and shawarma. All meats are prepared by an in-house butcher, and many special cuts are available for those who would like to prepare the meat themselves at home.
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Meat Point is a kosher steak house in North Dallas that also offers up a lunch menu featuring sandwiches and hummus plates.
Hank Vaughn
The lunch menu at Meat Point offers several sandwiches as well as hummus, salad and a more limited number of entrées. The hummus plates include house hummus and hand-made tahini; some, such as the shawarma hummus, also include a protein. We chose the mixed platter for a good variety to start our lunch: Moroccan cigars, kobbes and pastels served with tahini, tomatoes, cucumbers and pickles.

The Moroccan cigars resembled little eggrolls: thin dough full of ground spiced meat with a nice crunch. The kobbes appeared to be kibbeh, a fried mixture of ground beef, onions and bulgur wheat. The pastels were like little samosas stuffed with a starch (probably chickpea) and deep fried as well. All were served atop a large dollop of tahini sauce and came accompanied by various vegetables. All brought several complex flavors to the table that the tahini perfectly complemented.
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A sampler plate from Meat Point, a kosher steak house and more in North Dallas.
Hank Vaughn
Several sandwich choices are available, including the Jerusalem mix (chicken, chicken liver and beef), shawarma (chicken or lamb) and pargiot, all of which come on your choice of pita, laffa and baguette and whose spice level can be personalized. We went with the spicy lamb shawarma on baguette. It was a large sandwich, perhaps a 12-inch firm baguette full of lamb chunks, onions, tahini and spices that came with a side of French fries. It was extremely good and equally messy, and we somehow managed to finish the whole thing without touching the fries.
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Lamb shawarma on a baguette
Hank Vaughn
Our second entrée was schnitzel, prepared using chicken breast with a bread crumb crust. It came with a choice of two sides; we chose rice and grilled mixed vegetables. It was a decently sized piece of chicken that wasn’t dry, with a coating that held together well. The sides of rice with vermicelli and grilled zucchini and eggplant were a welcomed addition.
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Chicken schnitzel with rice and grilled veggies.
Hank Vaughn
This was a lot for lunch, so we had to pass when the waitress asked about dessert. She reminded us about the available cocktails and the larger dinner menu, which does sound intriguing. Sure, you can get a tomahawk ribeye or veal chop, but what really demands some hands-on research is the “Heart Attack” burger: a 12-ounce Angus burger topped with four ounces of lamb, a ribeye patty and a sunny side up egg. Your LDL levels take a hit just reading the description.

The one thing we weren’t thrilled about was the name of the restaurant. While not as on the nose as “The Hungry Heifer” of Cheers fame, “Meat Point” is perhaps not the most appetizing of names. Nonetheless, if you can get past frivolous issues like branding, this is good eats.

7114 Campbell Road, No. 102. Monday – Thursday, noon – 10 p.m.; Friday, 11 a.m. – 3 p.m.; Sunday, 5 p.m. – 10 p.m.; closed Saturday.
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Hank Vaughn is a freelance writer who enjoys sharing and overthinking his food and drink experiences, both good and bad, from his culinary journeys with his wife across North Texas and beyond.
Contact: Hank Vaughn

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