Crime

Brother Moses Drummer Corey Dill Released from the Hospital Following Deep Ellum Robbery

Brother Moses drummer Corey Dill (left) says he's "doing pretty well" following his release from Baylor Medical Center to treat injuries he received during a robbery on Oct. 19. His band mates, from left, include guitarist and keyboard player John-Lewis Anderson, guitarist and singer James Lockhart and guitarist Moses Gomez (not pictured bassist and singer Lucas Templin).
Brother Moses drummer Corey Dill (left) says he's "doing pretty well" following his release from Baylor Medical Center to treat injuries he received during a robbery on Oct. 19. His band mates, from left, include guitarist and keyboard player John-Lewis Anderson, guitarist and singer James Lockhart and guitarist Moses Gomez (not pictured bassist and singer Lucas Templin). James Lockhart
Brother Moses drummer Corey Dill is out of the hospital, but he's still got a long way to go to make a full recovery. Dill spent just under a month in Baylor Medical Center recuperating from injuries he received following a confrontation with a burglar who broke into the band's van just before the indie Arkansas rock band were set to play an Oct. 19 show at the Deep Ellum Art Co.

Dill is still able to walk, but it will take about six weeks for him to heal, so he spends most of his time in a wheelchair. The swelling in his face has gone down, and he's getting some strength in his right arm, but he says he still finds it hard to move with his broke clavicle.

"But for the most part," Dill says, "I felt like I was able to roll with it, and it is what it is, and I'll do what I can do ... is the way I'm trying to approach it."

Dill and guitarist Moses Gomez were walking back to the venue to perform on Oct. 19 when they spotted a man rooting around the van and realized it wasn't "one of the guys getting a change of clothes or something," Dill says. They chased the unidentified man, who fled the scene with some of the band's stuff, including Dill's backpack.

"He walked pretty quickly into the little alley but didn't take off running yet," Dill says. "As he got into the alley, he started running."

Dill saw the man dive into the passenger side of a black GMC Sierra truck. The next thing he remembers is waking up on the ground "in a lot of pain."

"I don't really remember anything after that, like, if I grabbed him or tried to wrestle him out," Dill says. "In my mind, he got to the passenger door as he's scooting in and that's kind of the end of what I remember until I'm laying on the ground a few moments later."

Gomez said a few days after the incident that the getaway vehicle may have run over Dill as the unidentified man and his driver made their escape. Dill sustained several injuries including a broken pelvis that's being held in place by a surgically installed metal brace. He has already been in surgery twice since the incident.

"There's bits of information that nurses would kind of drop," Dill says. "They just assumed I was not gonna walk for a couple of months and maybe had told me, but I wasn't conscious at the time. Bits of information kept trickling in in kind of jarring ways. Waking up with a couple of 5-inch-long metal things sticking out of my hips was quite an experience."

"Waking up with a couple of 5-inch-long metal things sticking out of my hips was quite an experience." – Corey Dill

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The response to the band and his friends' and family's call for help have been overwhelming. Dill says he doesn't have health insurance, but fans and supporters have ponied up over $58,000 in donations to help him cover them on GoFundMe, including one anonymous donor who gave him a $10,000 donation.

"The support and all the love I received was incredible, especially the first few days when I didn't have my phone and my wife would read things like comments and messages," Dill says. "I found that very encouraging and uplifting. It's incredible to see how many people were backing me up."

These days, he's doing whatever he's able to do to keep busy while he rests in a loft owned by Deep Ellum Art Co. owner John LaRue, who gave Dill a place to stay until he's well enough to travel. His bandmates chipped in and bought him a Nintendo Switch so he mostly spends his time "sitting up and playing Legend of Zelda."

Dill says there are more surgeries and rehab in his future before he can walk again once he can get a smaller fixator to hold his pelvis in place, which should take about six weeks.

"I'm definitely restless," Dill says. "I would love to be able to at least get home. Otherwise, I'm still trying to take it a day at time." 
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Danny Gallagher has been a regular contributor to the Dallas Observer since 2014. He has also written features, essays and stories for MTV, the Chicago Tribune, Maxim, Cracked, Mental_Floss, The Week, CNET and The Onion AV Club.