Concert Reviews

Review: Interpol's Show at The Factory Brought a Welcome Taste of the mid-2000s to a Packed House

Interpol packed the Factory on Monday night, delivering a set with something for fans from all eras of the band's career.
Interpol packed the Factory on Monday night, delivering a set with something for fans from all eras of the band's career. Vera "Velma" Hernandez
Lights dim, fog rolling in, the five-piece band Interpol strolled out onto the stage while flood lights illuminated the packed Factory.

There was an instant change in atmosphere as their tour mates finished up: Matthew Dear, a Texas native solo electronic avant-pop act; and Tycho, a futuristic electronic band that deals heavy with lo-fi elements and stunning visuals splashed across a white backdrop.
click to enlarge Tycho combined lo-fi elements and stunning visuals during their opening set for the Interpol show at The Factory. - VERA "VELMA" HERNANDEZ
Tycho combined lo-fi elements and stunning visuals during their opening set for the Interpol show at The Factory.
Vera "Velma" Hernandez
All dressed in their best black outfits, New York-based headliner immediately went into it, starting off with "Untitled" off their 2002 album Turn On The Bright Lights. Paul Banks and Daniel Kessler's guitars rang out somber tones, and as soon as the last note faded, Banks raced right into "Evil," arguably their best known track off of Antics.
click to enlarge Matthew Dear, a Texas native and solo electronic avant-pop act, was one of two opening acts for the Interpol show at The Factory. - VERA "VELMA" HERNANDEZ
Matthew Dear, a Texas native and solo electronic avant-pop act, was one of two opening acts for the Interpol show at The Factory.
Vera "Velma" Hernandez
As the crowd danced and sang along, Interpol continued with their 17-song, three-encore set. Sam Fogarinos' syncopated drumbeats coupled with the waves of light had every soul on the floor of the Factory swaying, leaving next to nothing left to be desired.
click to enlarge Interpol's Paul Banks - VERA "VELMA" HERNANDEZ
Interpol's Paul Banks
Vera "Velma" Hernandez
Their set consisted of five songs off Antics, five from Turn On The Bright Lights, four from their latest album, The Other Side of Make-Believe, two from Marauder, two off Our Love to Admire, then one each from El Pintor and the self-titled Interpol. The sampling of songs meant that fans who started following the band either earlier or later in their career all heard a favorite track that night.
click to enlarge Interpol's Daniel Kessler - VERA "VELMA" HERNANDEZ
Interpol's Daniel Kessler
Vera "Velma" Hernandez
The light design was absolutely brilliant, literally. They had a disco ball on stage reflecting and shooting off beams of light all throughout the venue. They let their music do the talking, with scattered "Thank you, Dallas," several grateful smiles to the crowd when they weren't brooding in the dark fog and perfectly timed introductions.
click to enlarge Interpol's Sam Fogarino - VERA "VELMA" HERNANDEZ
Interpol's Sam Fogarino
Vera "Velma" Hernandez
Ending the near perfect set-list they wrapped up  with a fast paced "Slow Hands."

It was the mid-2000s all over again.
click to enlarge Interpol - VERA "VELMA" HERNANDEZ
Interpol
Vera "Velma" Hernandez
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