Concert Reviews

The Legendary Buddy Guy Brought Authentic Blues to Dallas, Cursing and All

Buddy Guy influenced some of the most influential rock musicians through time and changed all of music.
Buddy Guy influenced some of the most influential rock musicians through time and changed all of music. Andrew Sherman
The term "legend" gets thrown around a lot, but if anyone has earned it, it's blues guitarist Buddy Guy. George "Buddy" Guy was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1985 and has won eight Grammys, including the Lifetime Achievement Award in 2015. Since he began singing and playing the blues in 1957, he's influenced a generations of rock icons including Jimi Hendrix, Jimmy Page and Eric Clapton, just to name a few.

The House of Blues show on Tuesday night was Guy’s first Dallas concert since the pandemic. His tone and fingers are still on point at 85 years young.

Colin James opened the show and really set a mood. James hails from Vancouver and got his first big break opening for Stevie Ray Vaughan for a concert when he was only 18 years old.
click to enlarge Buddy Guy is still one of the greats, as he proved at his House of Blues show on Tuesday. - ANDREW SHERMAN
Buddy Guy is still one of the greats, as he proved at his House of Blues show on Tuesday.
Andrew Sherman
Guy took the stage with a caveat: “If you don’t like the Blues you’re in the wrong fucking club.” He kept shouting out how happy he was to be in Dallas and inserting foul language all night to the crowd's delight.

After touring since his teens, it's no surprise that Guy is the ultimate performer, teasing and playing back and forth with the audience. He would respond directly to audience members that shouted to him, but with charming sarcasm. Guy is as much a story teller as he is a guitar master. At one point he had the fans sing the chorus to “I Just Want to Make Love With You” and jokingly warned the audience not to “fuck up his song.”
click to enlarge Buddy Guy gave it right back to the audience on Tuesday night. - ANDREW SHERMAN
Buddy Guy gave it right back to the audience on Tuesday night.
Andrew Sherman
Guy swore a lot at the show, and also liked to talk about his swearing. He told the crowd that he started cursing more after he saw how lucrative hip-hop was — although it seems like he’s been cursing for a bit longer than that. But he was also wholesome. Guy really brought the room together at one point when he said, “If the world was like me it would be a better place, 'cause I like everyone. I want you to do what you want to and let me do what I want to do.”

Besides the stories there was, no doubt, a night of some of the truest blues around. Guy played his standard set and gave solos to the rest of his band in turn. It was nothing short of riveting to watch the blues icon bending the strings and doing his signature guitar-playing the guitar with his arm and chest.

The blues have influenced so much of the mainstream music we have come to love over the years, and in no small part thanks to Buddy Guy, who was and — as he proved Tuesday — still is one of the greats. 
click to enlarge Buddy Guy still plays better than most musicians. - ANDREW SHERMAN
Buddy Guy still plays better than most musicians.
Andrew Sherman
click to enlarge Buddy Guy cursed up a storm at his show because of hip-hop. - ANDREW SHERMAN
Buddy Guy cursed up a storm at his show because of hip-hop.
Andrew Sherman
click to enlarge Buddy Guy had great, albeit sarcastic, words for the audience at his Dallas who on Tuesday. - ANDREW SHERMAN
Buddy Guy had great, albeit sarcastic, words for the audience at his Dallas who on Tuesday.
Andrew Sherman
click to enlarge The great Buddy Guy brought the true blues to Dallas. - ANDREW SHERMAN
The great Buddy Guy brought the true blues to Dallas.
Andrew Sherman
click to enlarge Buddy Guy fit right in at the House of Blues. - ANDREW SHERMAN
Buddy Guy fit right in at the House of Blues.
Andrew Sherman
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