4
| News |

New Police Computer System Error Sets Three Inmates Free

^
Keep Dallas Observer Free
I Support
  • Local
  • Community
  • Journalism
  • logo

Support the independent voice of Dallas and help keep the future of Dallas Observer free.

It's never been a better time to get busted in Dallas, at least for inmates Willie Brown, James Langley and Jose Morquecho, who were each politely escorted out of the county jail on Thursday and set free thanks to an error caused by officers' unfamiliarity with a new computer system.

On June 1, a new field reporting system and records management system were launched. But the system has been off to a shaky start. Apparently officers didn't factor in a learning curve adjustment in using the system.

"This system is probably the greatest change in the way we do things in the police department," said Major Scott Bratcher in a press conference. "We're changing the way we report every incident, the way we categorize the information, and the way we manage our cases from here on out. And it all changed in one minute."

Bratcher admits the department has underestimated the difficulties in adjusting to the new system. Field officers complained of difficulty in reporting cases. Over 600 reports were sent back to officers for correction in the first few days of the system, because officers didn't know how to properly fill out newfangled online forms.

Bratcher says only nine people were delegated to train the 3,500 department employees on the new computer system. But, he says, now the department is down to fewer than 200 returned reports. "Things seem to be getting better. We knew this was going to have a big impact on the department, we were just a little short on how big an impact."

The three released inmates are nonviolent offenders, and were arrested for home burglary, felony theft, and vehicular burglary, respectively.

"I would expect, by the end of the month, that we will have everything ironed out," Bratcher says.

Keep the Dallas Observer Free... Since we started the Dallas Observer, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of Dallas, and we would like to keep it that way. Offering our readers free access to incisive coverage of local news, food and culture. Producing stories on everything from political scandals to the hottest new bands, with gutsy reporting, stylish writing, and staffers who've won everything from the Society of Professional Journalists' Sigma Delta Chi feature-writing award to the Casey Medal for Meritorious Journalism. But with local journalism's existence under siege and advertising revenue setbacks having a larger impact, it is important now more than ever for us to rally support behind funding our local journalism. You can help by participating in our "I Support" membership program, allowing us to keep covering Dallas with no paywalls.

We use cookies to collect and analyze information on site performance and usage, and to enhance and customize content and advertisements. By clicking 'X' or continuing to use the site, you agree to allow cookies to be placed. To find out more, visit our cookies policy and our privacy policy.

 

Join the Observer community and help support independent local journalism in Dallas.

 

Join the Observer community and help support independent local journalism in Dallas.