MORE

Tips For Making The Best Meatballs Ever With Julian Barsotti

With a few tips and tricks, you can make your own meatballs like a pro.
With a few tips and tricks, you can make your own meatballs like a pro.

As a home cook, I've never been happy with my meatballs. I've always made a great tomato sauce, adapted from a recipe in The French Laundry Cookbook, but my meatballs were always bland, dense and rubbery. I'm well aware my biggest problem was that I never used a recipe, opting instead to dump meat, herbs, eggs and breadcrumbs into a bowl and hoping for the best. I thought meatballs were so pedestrian they didn't require care. I was wrong.

To improve my technique I talked to Julian Barsotti, whose spaghetti and meatball dish impressed me when I reviewed his restaurant Carbone's this summer. Instead of asking him for a recipe, I asked him about tips that could be applied to any meatball recipe to make them better. If you have a favorite meatball recipe you've been using for ages, get ready. It's about to get a whole lot better.

Start with high quality pork and grind it yourself.
Start with high quality pork and grind it yourself.

Use the best ingredients you can. Like most chefs, Barsotti considers the quality of his ingredients to be among the most important factors. "You are more than half of the way there if you start with great ingredients," he said, recommending you have your butcher freshly grind your meat. I'm taking that one step further and recommending you grind your own. Meat grinders are relatively inexpensive, and if you have a Kitchen Aid mixer you can buy an attachment that takes hand-cranking out of the equation. In addition to making for better meatballs, your burgers and other recipes that make use of ground meat will get a lot better too.

If you have a Kitchen Aid mixer, the meat grinder attachment will elevate any of your dishes that call for ground meat.
If you have a Kitchen Aid mixer, the meat grinder attachment will elevate any of your dishes that call for ground meat.
Meat ground at home is lighter and more aerated, and you can grind to your desired coarseness depending on the recipe you're using.
Meat ground at home is lighter and more aerated, and you can grind to your desired coarseness depending on the recipe you're using.
Use a blender to make your own bread crumbs or buy panko.
Use a blender to make your own bread crumbs or buy panko.

The same goes for your breadcrumbs. If you're using those dry, sandy, flavorless breadcrumbs that come in a cardboard can, stop now. You can easily grind your own up in a blender using stale, day-old bread. If you still want to buy them, opt for panko breadcrumbs, which are lighter and have better texture.

Sautee your aromatics to add more depth of flavor.
Sautee your aromatics to add more depth of flavor.

Saute your aromatics. Raw onions taste OK, but onions sauteed in bacon fat taste great. Herbs and other seasonings can be cooked with the onions to lend more flavor to your meatballs. Make sure you cool the mixture completely before you add it to the meat.

Meatball steroids
Meatball steroids
Keep your mixture as light and fluffy as possible
Keep your mixture as light and fluffy as possible

Don't over-work your mixture and keep things cold. Just like with burgers, over-mixing the meat will cause a dense and undesirable texture. If you decide to make use of a meat grinder you can grind the meat, salt and aromatics together for seriously smooth and consistent meat balls. Use a fork or gently use your hands when you fold bread, eggs or other binders into the mix.

Store everything in your refrigerator when you're not working to keep things cool and prevent the fat from breaking down. Cold hands (use an ice bath) and tools will help to keep the mixture from getting too warm.  

An ice cream scoop will help you make consistently sized meatballs.
An ice cream scoop will help you make consistently sized meatballs.

Use an ice cream scoop to portion your meatballs. An ice cream scoop will assure every meat ball is exactly the same size, and you'll work more quickly and efficiently. Drop the meat mixture onto a sheet pan and then gently roll them into perfectly rounded balls.

You can get just as much browning by baking your meatballs in the oven, and you wont have to wipe up a bunch of splattered grease.
You can get just as much browning by baking your meatballs in the oven, and you wont have to wipe up a bunch of splattered grease.

Bake your meatballs to brown them. Sauteing meatballs in oil adds flavor but is inefficient and messy. You'll end up with meatballs that are browned unevenly, and your stove will be covered with spattered grease. Put that oil on a piece of parchment paper in a sheet pan and bake your meatballs in the oven at 350 until they are golden brown.

Braise your meat balls for at least an hour, or until they're tender.
Braise your meat balls for at least an hour, or until they're tender.

Braise the meatballs for at least an hour. Letting your meatballs simmer in a sauce for an extended period of time will encourage tenderness. It will also lend flavor to your sauce. An hour should be plenty, but cook them until they feel tender with a fork. Be careful not to cook them too long, though. They'll get so tender they fall apart. If that happens just break them up and tell your guests you made meat sauce.


Sponsor Content

Newsletters

All-access pass to top stories, events and offers around town.

Sign Up >

No Thanks!

Remind Me Later >