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Ghostland Observatory, Neon Indian to Headline Homegrown Fest in 2016

It's February, which in Texas means it's just about festival season. Really. South by Southwest is only a month away, meaning so too are 35 Denton and Spillover. Hell, music and film fest Thin Line is next weekend. So it's about time for some of Dallas' bigger late spring and summertime fests to start rolling out their lineups and, right on cue, Homegrown Music and Arts Festival has the lowdown on their seventh-annual installment.

Leading the way are two bands with strong ties to Austin (although, ahem, Denton in the one case), Ghostland Observatory and Neon Indian. Both have played Dallas in varying forms recently: In Ghostland's case, it was band leader Aaron Behrens' other band, the Midnight Stroll, and in Neon Indian's it was a visit to The Bomb Factory for purportedly the last-ever Red Bull Sound Select show in Dallas last November.

Either way, the bookings keep up Homegrown's long-running tradition of going heavy on indie rock with their all-Texas fest, which may make even more sense than before in order to differentiate itself from Homegrown's new sibling, the Old 97's County Fair, which takes place in the same location — Main Street Garden Park — the month before.

And hey, it's been a successful formula so far. 2015's last-minute, weather-related change of location to The Bomb Factory from Main Street Garden Park (where festivities return this year) might have obscured the fact, but Homegrown is one of the best, and best booked, fests in North Texas.

Behind some of the other bigger, out-of-town names like Wild Child and Bright Light Social Hour, there's an eclectic mix of local artists, including rapper Bobby Sessions, bluesman Charley Crockett and R&B singer Kirk Thurmond. They even addressed a blind spot of last year's fest with budding YouTube star (and Best Keyboardist in North Texas, thank you very much) Kaela Sinclair.

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Homegrown Fest takes place from noon to 11 p.m. on Saturday, May 14, at Main Street Garden Park in downtown Dallas. Tickets are on sale now at homegrownfest.com and range from $35 for general admission to $100 for VIP, with children 10 years old and under getting in free.

The full lineup of bands:

Ghostland Observatory
Neon Indian
Wild Child
Bright Light Social Hour
Will Johnson
Pageantry
Kaela Sinclair
Bobby Sessions
Charley Crockett
Kirk Thurmond & The Millenials
Young Mammals
The Misteries

HOMEGROWN FEST announce party with DJ Wanz Dover and a surprise music guest takes place at 8 p.m. tonight, Wednesday, February 10, at Off the Record. Free.

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