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A Duncanville Soldier Died in Germany; Cause of Death Being Investigated

This morning comes word from the Army that a 26-year-old PFC from Duncanville, David W. Webb, died over the weekend in Germany -- though no one yet knows why. Reports the Associated Press, Webb was taken on Sunday night to the Leopoldina Hospital in Schweinfurt -- where Webb was stationed with the 1-18th Infantry Battalion, 2nd Brigade, 1st Infantry Division -- where he was pronounced dead by German medical authorities.

No word, though, on the cause of death. When reached this morning at U.S. Army Europe HQ in Heidelberg, Germany, Bruce Anderson told Unfair Park that Webb was "found unresponsive in his barracks by fellow soldiers on Sunday morning," then transported to the hospital by paramedics. "Beyond that," he says, "we don't have any other details."

Anderson, a civilian in the Army's European Public Affairs office, also says investigations are held every single time a soldier dies, "whether it's in combat or at home," and that there will be no ruling in Webb's death till an autopsy and toxicology tests are completed, which could take several days at the very least. Nonetheless, a memorial service is being held for Webb, who leaves behind his father and sister, tomorrow at the Ledward Barracks Chapel in Schweinfurt. After the jump, the official Army release. --Robert Wilonsky

For Immediate Release

Dead Schweinfurt Soldier Identified

HEIDELBERG (30 January, 2008) – A V Corps Soldier based in Schweinfurt was pronounced dead by German medical authorities at approximately 9 a.m. Sunday at Leopoldina Hospital in Schweinfurt.

Dead is Private First Class David W. Webb, 26, of Duncanville, Texas. He was assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1-18 Infantry Battalion, 2nd Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, Schweinfurt. He is survived by his father and his sister.

The memorial ceremony for Webb will be held at the Ledward Barracks Chapel in Schweinfurt on Thursday, 31 January 2008, 10:00 a.m. Members of the community, friends, and family are all welcome to attend the ceremony.

The cause of death is under investigation.

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