Real Estate

A Sign of the Times on the Margaret Hunt Hill and Other Snapshots From Saturday

Our pros have been all over the Margaret Hunt Hill this weekend, with one, Jay Barker, sending word from the sun-up service this morning that Santiago Calatrava "hinted that this three-day celebration was a bit excessive." Ya don't say. You can see Danny and Paul and Jay's their fine work at right, in the slideshows, with more to come before the day's out. Remember: You're free to traverse the bridge till 4 p.m. today.

Frank Librio, spokesman for the city, sent word last night that it has been quite the popular destination this weekend, with 2,000 attending Friday night's kick-off and 16,000 walking over the Trinity between noon and 6 p.m. yesterday. Writes he, "About 2,000 people have been on the bridge at one time -- not exceeding the 6,750 capacity. At no time has access had to be restricted and there have been no major incidents." Last night over dinner I heard differing accounts -- not about any incidents, though it could get crushingly claustrophobic being squeezed between tents and food trucks and stages, but about folks being stopped from entering the bridge. Anyway.

My 8-year-old son was eager to shoot a few final photos for Unfair Park, and the one above may be my favorite from our Saturday on the Calatrava and 'round West Dallas; he spent quite a bit of time getting this one right. On the other side, a few more -- including one of The Relatives, who, as Angus Wynne said two songs into their glorious set, may be "as close we'll get to Al 'TNT' Braggs these days." Amen, brother. Till tomorrow. Try to contain yourself.








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Robert Wilonsky
Contact: Robert Wilonsky