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KTVT's Got Itself a New UHF Signal

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Last week came word that KTVT-Channel 11 had gone to the Federal Communications Commission to get a new frequency following the digital transition. And why was such an emergency petition necessary? Because, according to KTVT docs on file with the FCC, the local CBS affiliate "has received thousands of complaints from viewers unable to receive its signal since moving to its post-transition frequency, Channel 11, on June 12, 2009." It didn't take long for the feds to grant the application: KTVT just sent out a media release announcing that it "will begin transmitting a stronger digital signal" following a move to the UHF band beginning August 4 at 11 a.m.

The entire press release follows, but this is what KTVT's president and general manager Steve Mauldin says about the relocation: "We're happy to make this move to the UHF band to accommodate those who have had difficulty receiving our VHF signal since the digital TV transition. We believe that this will make it easier for our over-the-air viewers to watch their favorite news and entertainment programs."

CBS 11 IMPROVES SIGNAL STRENGTH WITH POWER INCREASE AND MOVE TO UHF BAND

Viewers Using Antennas Need to Re-Scan After 11 a.m. on Aug. 4

Dallas/Fort Worth - In order to improve reception for North Texas television viewers who use antennas, CBS 11 will begin transmitting a stronger digital signal on the UHF band beginning Tuesday, Aug. 4 at 11 a.m.

Cable and satellite TV subscribers should not be affected and do not need to take any action.  However, viewers who receive their television signals via antennas will need to re-scan their converter boxes and/or digital TV tuners after 11 a.m. on Aug. 4 to receive the higher-powered signal on channel 11-1.

"We're happy to make this move to the UHF band to accommodate those who have had difficulty receiving our VHF signal since the digital TV transition," said CBS 11 President and General Manager Steve Mauldin. "We believe that this will make it easier for our over-the-air viewers to watch their favorite news and entertainment programs."

Since the June 12 transition to digital television, a number of viewers in markets across the country, including Dallas-Fort Worth, have been unable to receive various stations broadcasting on VHF channels. The problems have been attributed to factors including outside interference, insufficient signal strength (which is regulated by the FCC) and inadequate antennas.

CBS 11 employees will staff a special hotline, 877-TEXAS-11 following the switch to answer any viewer questions and provide technical assistance.

CBS 11 is always on at cbs11tv.com.

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