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| Brunch |

Booty's Street Food Peddles Global Bites & Cocktails, Plus a Drag Show Brunch

The name of this spot, Booty's, is a reference to pirates, who were the original travelers of the world, and their loot.
The name of this spot, Booty's, is a reference to pirates, who were the original travelers of the world, and their loot.
Booty's Street Food
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Booty’s Street Food in Deep Ellum is giving new life to the once-popular New Orleans cocktail bar and restaurant. The space is connected to Deep Ellum Hostel and serves as both a hangout for travelers and locals.

The concept was created by Kent Roth and Collin Ballard, who when younger would stay at hostels when they traveled, more than 100 collectively. Their experiences made them want to create a similar space for travelers in Texas.

Their first project was in Austin where they converted the oldest standing firehouse in the city into a hostel and renovated the first-floor bar into the Firehouse Lounge, which is now a popular speakeasy for both locals and travelers.

Eager to extend their concept, Roth and Ballard searched Austin for another spot but, instead, landed on the century-old building in Deep Ellum at the corner of Elm and Crowdus. They spent $1.7 million transforming the 10,000-square-foot space into the Deep Ellum Hostel, which was completed in 2018. Initially, the Spanish restaurant and bar, Izkina, flanked the space.

During trips to New Orleans, the two grew fond of Booty’s Street Food and the menu, which was focused on small plates and street food from around the world. Back in Dallas, after a full year the Izkina concept was not working, so they decided to change course and collaborated with the original Booty’s founders to bring it to life in Dallas.

Sijang-Tongdak, market chicken from Seoul, South Korea
Sijang-Tongdak, market chicken from Seoul, South Korea
Booty's Street Food

The menu at Booty’s highlights popular street foods in different countries. Plates include patatas bravas (Spain), fasirt sliders (braised pork meatballs of Budapest), sijang-tongdak (market chicken of Seoul).

In addition, they recently introduced a Passport Series that spotlights a new culinary destination every two weeks. From May 5 to 16, they’ll have specials from India. Then they’ll switch to Poland for two weeks and Argentina at the beginning of June. (I had a weird hotdog-mashed potato thing wrapped in some sort of tortilla from a street cart in Stockholm that was one of the best things I ever ate. Just throwing that out there.)

In a nod to the adjacent hostel, the most expensive item on the menu is $12.

The cocktail menu is also globally inspired and includes a frozen Singapore Sling made with gin, pineapple, lime, grenadine and amaro.

Previous drag queen show at Booty'sEXPAND
Previous drag queen show at Booty's
Booty's Street Food


In true New Orleans style, every few weeks Booty's hosts a drag show brunch. This Sunday, May 2, Barbie Davenport Dupree will host the Throwback Drag Brunch which will have a 70s, 80s and 90s theme. (But really is the 90s throwback already? Can we vote on that?).

Dezi 5 will provide the beats. The first seating is at noon and the second is at 3 p.m. Tickets are $19 and include admission only; food and booze are separate.

Booty's Street Foods, 2801 Elm St. (Deep Ellum). Open 5 p.m. to 12 a.m., Wednesday through Thursday, 5 p.m. to 2 a.m. Friday, Noon to 2 a.m. Saturday and Noon to 10 p.m. Sunday. Closed Monday and Tuesday. 

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