Food News

Malibu Poke is Finally Opening, and There's Good Reason to Get Hyped for This Poke Spot

Malibu Poke's citrus ponzu salmon bowl.
Malibu Poke's citrus ponzu salmon bowl. Courtesy Kelsey Wilson/Malibu Poke
While things have (finally) slowed down in this explosive sector of the ever-growing fast casual scene, one new poke joint is coming that we've had an eye on since word of its arrival hit seven months ago: Malibu Poke. The Turtle Creek Village restaurant has finally announced an open date: Tuesday, Nov. 28.

What makes this poke spot different from the approximately 6,284 others in North Texas? A couple things: This one involves Jon Alexis, owner of TJ's Seafood, and he's determined to create a poke focused on better seafood sourcing. "Quite simply, it’s a better bowl of poke — the ‘fishmonger's poke,'" Alexis said in a press release. "Our emphasis is on freshness, nutrition and sustainability."

Another reason to get hyped for this poke: FT33's Matt McCallister has developed the menu, which means we might finally see some imaginative creations in this oft-reproduced concept. Those who want a "classic" poke bowl can go that route, but they can also "explore even bolder flavors such as smoked bonito aioli, yellow curry, Japanese sancho pepper, Asian pear, daikon, marinated shiitake mushrooms and more," according to the release.

Also interesting is Malibu Poke's emphasis on technology, which includes facial recognition software. The restaurant uses ordering kiosks, which is nothing new, but these self-serve kiosks "even allow guests to choose facial recognition features that 'remember' their order history," according to the press release.

When Malibu Poke opens just after the holiday, it will do lunch and dinner (11 a.m.-9 p.m. Sunday-Thursday, 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Friday and Saturday) and is likely to draw big crowds eager to try third-wave poke. We will certainly be among them.

click to enlarge
Malibu Poke's menu.
Courtesy of Malibu Poke
Malibu Poke, 3888 Oak Lawn Ave.
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Beth Rankin is an Ohio native and Cicerone-certified beer server who specializes in social media, food and drink, travel and news reporting. Her belief system revolves around the significance of Topo Chico, the refusal to eat crawfish out of season and the importance of local and regional foodways.
Contact: Beth Rankin