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Lady Antebellum Singer Hillary Scott's Tour Bus Caught Fire in Garland This Morning

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This weekend, Dallas is going to be the epicenter of country music. The 50th Academy of Country Music Awards will be taking place at AT&T Stadium on Sunday, and in the days preceding the gala basically everybody who's anybody in country music will be here to perform, including two nighttime parties across the street at Globe Life Park.

For that to happen, though, everybody needs to get here safely -- and as Lady Antebellum's lead singer Hillary Scott found out this morning, that's not something to be taken for granted.

See also: CMT Kickoff Fan Central 2015 in Dallas The ACM Awards Have Missed a Golden Opportunity to Showcase Texas Artists

Scott was on her way to Dallas early this morning (in fact, she'd basically made it all the way here) with her husband and tour manager when her bus suddenly caught fire passing through Garland. Considerable damage was done to the bus, but all four people on it (including the driver) all emerged unhurt.

Scott posted a photo of the bus to her Instagram this morning:

"Hey guys, we had a crazy morning on the way to Dallas today. Our bus tire caught on fire and we had to evacuate very quickly. EVERYONE IS SAFE AND SOUND," she wrote. "Thanking God for our safety and the safety of all of those who helped put this fire out and keep us safe. Love you all!!!!"

Joe Harn, Garland Police Department's public information officer, confirmed one of the tires blew out while the bus was on I-30, which resulted in a fire.

It happened at about 8:30 a.m. this morning, Harn said. Four people were on the bus, but no one was injured. I-30 was limited to one lane and everything cleared at about 11:30 a.m., Harn said.

The band's publicist did not return a request for comment.

It was a close call for sure, and Scott may have even felt like she was being watched over: Not long after she posted the bus photo, she shared another picture of her Bible on Instagram, writing everything in the bus's back lounge was destroyed except for it. "The outside cover was burned and messed up but NOT ONE PAGE was missing," she wrote.

If you can't catch Scott and her band this weekend, they'll be back in Dallas again very soon: On Saturday, May 2, they'll play at Gexa Energy Pavilion with Hunter Hayes and Sam Hunt as one of this summer's Country Megaticket performances.

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