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If You Illegally Downloaded the Girl-on-Girl Porn Flick 'Mommy and Me 2,' (You Know Who You Are), the Production Company is Coming For You

You know Combat Zone Corp. as the illustrious production company that brought you such unforgettable cinematic experiences as Bareback Mount Him, These Feet Were Made For Fucking and Chow My Puntang" All of them are motion pictures of the first order, I assure you, but all is not well in the company's California studios, as piracy is slowly eroding its ability to produce such quality fare.

But Combat Zone doesn't take such threats lying down on its knees lightly. Last week, it went on the offensive in federal court, suing a few dozen anonymous porn enthusiasts who have illegally downloaded Mommy and Me #2. That's the sequel to the original Mommy and Me, which, you'll remember, almost won a Nightmoves Award for best girl-on-girl film in 2010.

A handful of those defendants, identified as John Does 1-7, hail from North Texas, or at least their IP addresses do -- two from Dallas, two from Irving, one each from Euless, Bedford, and Mansfield. And they're all part of the same BitTorrent swarm via which Mommy and Me #2 was illegally transferred.

To head off any claim that the individuals thought the porn was the free amateur crap you find on the Internet, Combat Zone points out that its output is "easily discernible as a professional work" created by "professional performers, directors, cinematographers, lighting technicians, set designers and editors. Plaintiff created each work with professional-grade cameras, lighting, and editing equipment."

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The approach of naming scores of anonymous defendants in a copyright infringement lawsuit in hopes of subpoenaing their identities and making them pay isn't new. Patrick Michels wrote about the practice, and the Denton attorney who practices it most frequently, for a cover story last year.

Combat Zone, at least in the suits it filed Friday in Texas and Colorado, is represented by Dallas attorney Thomas Jacks. He hasn't returned my call yet. Neither has Combat Zone, though the extremely ordinary-sounding phone tree did make me wonder what it's like to be an office drone in the sex industry?

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