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Our Favorite Dallas Online Moments of 2020

Lock up your daughters and sons and husbands and wives because Beto O'Rourke is hot!
Lock up your daughters and sons and husbands and wives because Beto O'Rourke is hot!
Melissa Hennings
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Here's the part where we tell you how bad 2020 was while we make a vague promise that it can only get better. Then, we would expand on the fact that because of the global pandemic we were all stuck inside this year and pretend that was somehow unusual as if we aren't always stuck indoors by choice, glued on the internet. Then we would close out this paragraph with a short and simple sentence about how the internet saved us from the hell of 2020, but in reality, we all know the internet doesn't save anybody from anything because it's the internet and it just makes everything worse.

Who has the energy for that? Let's just get to it. Here are our favorite Very Online™ Dallas Moments from 2020. Enjoy!

Wedding company refuses a refund
In May, a supposed Dallas wedding videographer went viral after he refused to refund the groom after the bride died. After the groom went to the press with the story, things got ugly when the owner of the video company bought a web page just to mock him. Then on the day of the wedding, the company posted on its Facebook page that "we hope you sob and cry all day for what would have been your wedding day." Freelancers who previously worked for the company told us the company felt "sketchy."

KPop fans break DPD app
If something good happened this year, K-pop fans were most likely involved. When the Dallas Police Department tweeted a request to download its iWatch Dallas app and share videos of "illegal activity from the protests" happening this summer over civil unrest, K-pop fans flooded the app with fancams — basically an edited video of someone's idol. It didn't take long for DPD to tweet that the app was temporarily down.

Real Housewife is so unaware
This one is less of a "favorite" and more of an "Oh, boy." When the Black Lives Matter protests were at their height this summer, Real Housewife of Dallas Kameron Westcott posted a photo of herself on vacation, adding "Better days are ahead for everyone!" Then she hashtagged RHOD just to really drive it home.

Man becomes Shredded Cheese Husband overnight
The best thing to happen in 2020 was when an Allen man became Shredded Cheese Husband overnight after he complained that Mi Cocina was taking too long getting his wife shredded cheese. It probably wouldn't have been a big deal if it didn't happen in June when there was a global pandemic and people should have been at home instead of at restaurants complaining about the service. Oh, well.

A&M statue might be racist?
A TikToker named JP got a few hundred thousand views on his video about Monster Inc.'s Sulley being named after a Confederate hero and former Texas A&M president, Lawrence Sullivan "Sul" Ross. Students and alumni have petitioned for years for A&M to take down the statue of Ross, but for now, it stands.

RHOD films despite COVID-19
Kameron Westcott makes our list for the second time. In June, the Real Housewives of Dallas star posted on Instagram that things were starting to get back to normal in Dallas in terms of COVID-19, but things never returned to normal in Dallas. Despite this, RHOD filmed its fifth season and Bravo gave little insight into how safe things were.

Brooklyn and Bailey get COVID
Brooklyn and Bailey McKnight, YouTubers and Instagram influencers, announced in August they had COVID-19, but they promised their university, Baylor, did everything in its power to keep their students safe. The reason it made for such an interesting post is that Baylor pays Brooklyn and Bailey to promote the university, something we uncovered in early 2019.

Internet horny for Beto
It wouldn't be the internet if someone somewhere wasn't horny for a politician. After the National Rifle Association tweeted out a vague threat that former Congressman Beto O'Rourke was coming for our guns, users started responding what a dream that would be. The craziest part? This was the second time the internet lost their panties for the former presidential candidate.

Ferris Wheelers' owner saves a baby
Immediately after Cody Hand saved a baby from a kidnapping, he whipped out his phone and recorded a quick video of him reenacting the whole thing. Even though it was meant to only go to his close friends, he uploaded it to TikTok and soon became an overnight baby-saver.

Rockwall native helps Chicago dad go viral
After Rockwall's Chris Hart posted about the wholesome YouTube channel he found, called "Dad, How Do I," the channel's views increased by 10 times. Rob Kenney was the Chicago "dad" behind the YouTube channel, where he answered questions kids without dads might be curious to know. After the post went viral, Kenney told Hart that he had been "emotional all day and in shock."

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