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It was supposed to be the happiest day of his life, but after his fiancée died in a car crash, a dispute began between Justin Montney and a Dallas video company.
It was supposed to be the happiest day of his life, but after his fiancée died in a car crash, a dispute began between Justin Montney and a Dallas video company.
Melinda Pack/Unsplash

Wedding Video Company Allegedly Refused Refund and Mocked Man Whose Fiancée Died

Things keep getting stranger, and uglier, in the story of a man denied a refund after his fiancee died.

Justin Montney and Alexis-Athena Wyatt planned to wed in Colorado Springs this month, according to BuzzFeed News, but Wyatt died in a car crash in February.

Montney reached out to Copper Stallion Media, a Dallas-based wedding videography company, to ask for a refund of $1,800. When the company refused, Montney went to the press to tell his side of the story, and from there, things got vicious.

Copper Stallion Media bought a web page under Montney's name to mock him. According to a screenshot by BuzzFeed News, the website read, "On February 17, Justin reached out by email to tell us that the wedding was off due to the death of his fiancee. We replied and expressed our sympathy and explained to him that all of our wedding contracts are non-refundable. He kept emailing us trying to get a refund and we kept reiterating that the contract is non-refundable. We eventually stopped responding since the issue was moot."

On the day the wedding was supposed to take place, CSM posted on its Facebook page.

"Today would have been the day where we would have filmed Justin and Alexis' wedding," the Facebook page read, according to a screenshot by Denver7. "After what Justin pulled with the media stunt to try and shake us down for a refund we hope you sob and cry all day for what would have been your wedding day."

Thousands of people flooded review sites and left bad reviews for CSM. As of today, CSM's website, Facebook page and page on The Knot, a website for all things weddings, are no longer up, according to BuzzFeed News.

CSM's address on Google shows 325 N. St. Paul St., No. 3100, in Dallas, which appears to be a Regus office space, but two freelancers who said they worked for CSM in the past told Dallas Observer that their checks came from Las Vegas. (A freelancer sent us a photo of the check.) Regus did not return a request for confirmation by press time.

One California videographer, who asked to remain anonymous, says CSM paid her only after she sent 30 emails asking for her payment. She said she felt the company was sketchy when there was no direct phone number to call anyone about her payment.

A Texas videographer, who also asked to remain anonymous, says the checks came from Organized Weddings, LLC. According to the Denver Post, Organized Weddings is likely linked to Jesse J. Clark, who was "sued by the Massachusetts Attorney General in 2013 for taking the money of 90 couples and never delivering on their wedding videography."

Nicholas Frye, the attorney representing the plaintiffs, told Denver7 that Clark wasn't allowed to do business in Massachusetts anymore.

"He essentially fled Massachusetts with a number of warrants," Frye told Denver7. "The state attorney general had an order against him and he was no longer able to do business in Massachusetts."

People have taken to Twitter to call him out, and some people believe he's on Twitter, but the admin behind @jessejohnclark tweets that he has nothing to do with the controversy. Regardless, Denver7 reported evidence that it may be him.

That Texas videographer also says he never signed a 1099 form, and after he completed photographing the wedding, he emailed CSM for a few months asking for payment. Once he threatened to get the Texas Workforce Commission involved, CSM sent a check.

The Twitter account in question leads to a Medium account, where Clark writes about his haters.

"I love it when someone tries to bash me or talk bad about me like leaving a comment on my social media pages," the page reads. "It means that people are paying attention. There is one thing that I will not do in this life and that is walk quietly to my grave."

An email connected to his YouTube account bounces back, and his contact form on his website does not work.

"It recently became known to us that the Copper Stallion Media account on The Knot and WeddingWire was created under a false identity," a statement from The Knot to the Dallas Observer reads. "This violates our Terms of Use. As soon as we became aware, we took immediate action and removed Copper Stallion Media from our marketplaces on The Knot and WeddingWire. We have been following the tragic story involving Justin Montney and Alexis-Athena Wyatt, and the correspondence between Justin and Copper Stallion Media. We expect all couples to be treated with respect. Not only has Copper Stallion Media violated our Terms of Use for creating an account under a false identity, but its alleged actions with respect to Justin Montney and Alexis-Athena Wyatt are in direct violation of our Terms of Use.

"We are conducting a thorough investigation across our sites to determine if there are any other businesses that have been created under false identities by individuals associated with Copper Stallion Media and will take quick action to remove any listings that are found."

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