Celeste And Jesse, Timothy Green and the Other Films Opening in Dallas This Week

Celeste And Jesse, Timothy Green and the Other Films Opening in Dallas This Week

Ever do a search for "movies opening this weekend" only to find that none of the good ones are actually playing in Dallas? We're here to save you from that disappointment.


Wednesday 8.15 The Odd Life of Timothy Green Peter Hedges (author of What's Eating Gilbert Grape) pens the screenplay for and directs this new Disney feel-good, filmed in picturesque rural Georgia. The plot reads like Pet Cemetery's bizzaro world brother, where a barren couple (Jennifer Garner, and Joel Edgerton) get sloshed and scribble down their dream-child wishes, then creepily bury them in a garden. Cue the magical reverse rainstorm -- and -- bam! A ten year old boy appears, with leaves growing out of his legs. (If that's where babies really come from, I demand a do-over on my 20s.) -- Playing everywhere

Friday 8.17 Celeste And Jesse Forever -- Dollface Rashida Jones and Lonely Island's Andy Samberg star in this unconventional romantic comedy about an entirely too conventional relationship. The couple is inseparable; they've been together since high school, but Celeste suggests divorce. See, Jesse is unemployed, again. Celeste is doing great, but she'd like someone a bit more driven. It's what happens when two people get comfortable and forget what the pain of separation actually feels like. But don't worry, they'll feel it eventually. -- Playing at Angelika

The Expendables 2 -- This hit of cinematic Viagra brings all of your father's bro-crushes (Stallone, Van Damme, Li, Willis, Schwarzenegger, Lundgren, and more) together. Then it gives 'em a bunch of explosives and a quest for revenge. I just like that Arnold Schwarzenegger can quit politics and go right back to blowing shit up in summer blockbusters. That really is the American dream. -- Playing Everywhere

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The Color Wheel -- This black and white tells the story of siblings who's loathing for one another runs deep. And still, when she leaves her lover, she calls her brother to help her get her belongings out and lug them cross country. The Times called it "infuriating, but never boring." Personally, I'd just pawn some shit and hire movers. -- Playing at Texas Theatre

The Imposter -- This eerily woven documentary by Bart Layton weaves together footage, reenactments and interviews from a San Antonio family who mysteriously lost their son, Nicolas Barclay, and a Frenchman who assumes the role years later. It's odd that they're so accepting of him, even he thinks so. It's a true story thriller and it looks tremendous. -- Playing at Angelika

ParaNorman -- Done by Laika, the same folks who made Coraline, ParaNorman is an outsider's tale. It brings the dead to life with 3D stop motion animation and charms the hater out of you with its protagonist Norman, a kid with cool hair and a solid personal soundtrack. Also, he talks to, and reasons with, ghosts. I'd go on an adventure with him. -- Playing everywhere

Searching for Sugar Man -- Late '60s early '70s recording artist Rodriguez might have committed suicide on stage. Nobody really knows. That's because after his albums flopped, everyone in America stopped asking about him. That's not the case in South Africa where bootleg recordings have caused a fan resurgence. This documentary follows a pair of superfans who cross an ocean to seek the artist out. If they want to learn his story, they'll have to use the only clues they have: his song lyrics. -- Landmark Magnolia, Angelika Plano

Sparkle -- It's supposed to be known as a film about a '60s sister group and their dalliances with fame. It's going to be known as That Movie That Weirdly Has Whitney In It. I don't know about you guys, but I wasn't ready to see her face on the sides of so many buses. I'm still grieving, Sparkle. -- Playing everywhere


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