So Blue

Don't expect to find some old retired boxers when you meet 92-year-old "Pinetop" Perkins or 90-year-old David "Honeyboy" Edwards because, one, they're not boxers and, two, they're not even close to retirement. And neither are their colleagues, 96-year-old Henry James Townsend and 90-year-old Robert Lockwood Jr. These men are living legends—bluesicians of the highest order, and they're going to be in Grapevine for the Blue Shoe Project Gala. The Blue Shoe Project was started in 2004 to increase awareness, educate and promote appreciation for blues music.

Stellar is just about the only way to describe the careers of the bluesmen featured at this year's gala. "Pinetop" perfected boogie-woogie music as the piano player for Muddy Waters and was the recipient of the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. "Honeyboy" was featured in Martin Scorsese's PBS series, The Blues, and Lockwood mentored B.B. King and Buddy Guy. Henry James Townsend, the oldest of the crew, is the only artist in American music history to record for eight consecutive decades. These guys have influenced the likes of Eric Clapton, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Buddy Holly and countless other popular musicians. Allow them to influence you Friday at the Blue Shoe Project’s gala and silent auction. The event will be held at The Palace Arts Center Theater in downtown Grapevine. The silent auction starts at 6:30 p.m., and artist performances begin at 7:30 p.m. There will also be a live auction for an autographed guitar. Tickets range from $45 to $125. Proceeds benefit music education programs in area schools. Call 1-800-714-6019 or visit blueshoeproject.org.
Fri., Feb. 10, 6:30 p.m.

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Stephanie Morris