Healthcare

Cards Against Humanity to Give Profits from 'Dystopian Forced-Birth Hellscape' Texas to Abortion Fund

According to a survey conducted by Cards Against Humanity, 40% of men in states that banned or heavily restricted abortions think there are "four trimesters" in a pregnancy.
According to a survey conducted by Cards Against Humanity, 40% of men in states that banned or heavily restricted abortions think there are "four trimesters" in a pregnancy. Mike Brooks
Cards Against Humanity was printing off new packs of cards when the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade. That’s when Texas, along with 21 other states, “immediately turned itself into a dystopian forced-birth hellscape,” according to the company. Before it was overturned, the ruling guaranteed abortion as a constitutional right. In recent months, though, laws have taken effect in several states banning or heavily restricting abortion access.

The card game company wanted to do something about it.

“So we’re donating 100% of profits from orders to your nightmare-state to the National Network of Abortion Funds, plus $100,000 right now, to help the people most fucked over by the Republicans in your state government,” the company site reads. “We don’t need your money.”

The National Network of Abortion Funds is an organization that aims to increase access to abortions for low-income people across the country.

After Roe v. Wade was overturned, Cards Against Humanity conducted a survey to see what people knew about their state’s abortion laws and how they felt about them. “We also wanted to know what on earth the people in your state were thinking, so we asked them a few questions,” their site reads. “You will unfortunately believe what we found.”

The company detailed its findings on a web page titled “Cards Against Humanity Proves Your State Sucks,” splicing in commentary throughout.

“So much for the sanctity of life or whatever." – Cards Against Humanity

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Nine states, include Texas, now have total abortion bans. About 37% of people surveyed said they thought abortion was illegal from conception. Another 35% said they thought abortion was only illegal later in a pregnancy. Some 27% said they didn’t know if or when abortion is legal in their state.

“Turns out ignorance is bliss, until you need an abortion,” the company’s site says.

Texas and seven other states ban abortion without exceptions for rape or incest. But 80% of the people surveyed said they thought exceptions should be made in these instances. About 60% said they had no idea their state laws didn’t allow for such exceptions.

The company also asked people who think abortion should be illegal what the punishment for the crime should look like. Forty-three percent said there should either be no punishment or a small fine. Half of the people surveyed said an illegal abortion should lead to imprisonment, while another 7% said it should be punishable by death. A quarter of people said they didn’t believe abortion should be legal when a pregnancy threatens a mother’s life. The rest said there should be an exception.

“So much for the sanctity of life or whatever,” the site said.

About 70% of people said they thought casual sex was a major problem in society today. Half of them said they thought making abortions difficult or impossible to access could help solve this “problem.”

The card company’s survey also found that many men in anti-abortion states are ill-informed on pregnancy and female anatomy. Many men in these states, for example, don’t know what an ectopic pregnancy is. That’s when an embryo implants outside the uterus, and if untreated, it can kill the mother. According to the survey, 40% of men in these states wrongly think these embryos can survive to be born.” More than half “wrongly think these embryos can be re-implanted into the uterus,” the survey found.

“Sorry to bum you out,” the company adds on its site.

But all of this is why Cards Against Humanity is donating its profits to the National Network of Abortion Funds, and urging people to vote in upcoming elections. “For the love of God, don't forget to vote this fall,” the company said on its site. “Okay, time for some casual sex.”
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Jacob Vaughn, a former Brookhaven College journalism student, has written for the Observer since 2018, first as clubs editor. More recently, he's been in the news section as a staff writer covering City Hall, the Dallas Police Department and whatever else editors throw his way.
Contact: Jacob Vaughn